Why I became a doula and a Lamaze Educator

how to become a doula

When I was pregnant with my first child 10 years ago, I went through the normal pregnancy rites– picked a doctor and stuck with her because she was “nice”, took the crappy hospital classes that were nothing more than an L&D nurse reading a bunch of PowerPoint slides to us, and filled my baby’s room with a bunch of crap stuff, most of which I barely used. I went to the brand-name hospital. I assumed that, since I wanted a med-free vaginal birth and was planning to breastfeed, it would all end up being a breeze. I read all the books, felt smugly informed about my choices, and figured that was about it: Decide what kind of birth you want, get all of the baby items, and that’s about it.

Yeah, no.

I’m not one for regrets or guilt. Most of us do the best we can with the information and resources we have. After my daughter was born, I realized that maternity care, birth, motherhood, and breastfeeding were a hell of a lot more complicated than people want to admit. So, I kept reading books about birth. I scoured the internet for clues to why pregnancy and birth aren’t straightforward issues. I had a friend, also a new mom, who encouraged me to read, who loved to talk about the many “why”s floating around in my head. She slowly encouraged me to dig into evidence based birth and parenting practices, and helped me make choices that made parenting and breastfeeding easier for me an my daughter.

That summer after my daughter was born (she’s a fall baby), I was sitting with my best friend from college when it hit me like a thunderbolt: I had to become a doula. I had to become a childbirth educator. I spent weeks on end, while my daughter was down for her afternoon nap, scouring the internet, looking for information on becoming a doula and a childbirth educator. I connected with another woman who was a doula and childbirth educator in my area, and she proved to be a wonderful friend and fantastic mentor.

I chose to certify as a doula through DONA International; I’m a huge fan of doing things the right way, and I loved that DONA had been in existence the longest. It was important to me to have an in-person training, too– the smaller organizations either only offered online trainings or I would have had to travel to other parts of the US for training.  At the same time, I started looking at the different options I had to become a childbirth educator. I don’t know if it was their focus on normal birth, or that they specifically mentioned the roles that doulas play in improving birth outcomes, but my heart was always set on becoming an LCCE.

Pregnancy, birth, and parenting is a journey. I’m always honored to be asked to walk even a small portion of the path with families. This morning, while visiting a new mom in her home and holding her sweet daughter, I at once felt so grateful to do what I do– to support and educate new families. It is my calling. I’m exactly where I am supposed to be.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Business Basics Part One: Smart Starts

how to start birth business

I’ve written before about the realities of owning a business that not everyone knows about. I also spend a lot of time reading articles on running a business, talking with others about running a business, and loads and loads of time actually running the business. One of the biggest mistakes people make when starting something new from scratch is that they only hear a dead baseball player’s voice in their heads telling them, “If you build it, they will come.”

Gosh I hope people get that reference. Anyway.

You can be talented, passionate, skilled, etc….but there are things you need to do to get the little tiny sparks of inspiration and courage that got you excited to start your business to catch fire. I’m going to try to write a number of posts to help explain a little bit of what’s in my head and what I’ve learned (usually the hard way) to hopefully help others. Consider it a dose of reality wrapped in a candy coating of love. First up? Smart beginnings.

  • Have a office– either a real physical space or a space at home that’s only for work. If you went from being employed by another business to being self-employed, you may not have the discipline to stay accountable to yourself. Going to an office helps your brain switch from “hanging out” mode to working mode so you can actually focus on the tasks at hand. Having an actual office helps you seem more legitimate to others, too. Just don’t make the mistake of getting a luxury space before you have the income to justify it.
  • Don’t spend your precious time doing easy stuff like trying to build Facebook. The reality? Social media isn’t the amazing free marketing tool that it was 5 years ago. Sure, having a presence there builds engagement, but you have more important things to do, and it’s too easy to get sucked in to reading through your own Facebook or Twitter feed.
  • Spend time figuring out not just what you’re trying to sell, be it a service or a product, but what you’re going to tell people when they ask why they need whatever you’re trying to do or sell. Also helpful? Figure out how to set yourself apart, or, if you want a tongue-in-cheek, singable way to put it: You’ve gotta get a gimmick if you want to get ahead. (The video is mostly safe for work until the 3:00 mark.) I’ve never seen a single episode of Mad Men, but I have to imagine that’s Marketing 101.
  • Don’t know what to do? Learn! Get yourself a good mentor. Check in with some of the amazing resources out there from places like Entrepreneur or Inc. magazine. When I’m feeling a tiny bit stuck, those places can be awesome sources of insight and inspiration.  (Which reminds me: I need to schedule time with my mentor.)
  • Get yourself a good banker. I’ve been lucky to have come across a really good one. The smaller banks who focus on small (like, small, not just “capital less than $5 million” small) businesses can again help you learn how to be smart with money and give you access to capital tools to help you get of the ground. Meet with your banker quarterly.

My main point? If you’re going to be successful, you have to do the work. You. Don’t expect someone else to come along and do all of the heavy lifting for you. Be disciplined, be creative, and be deliberate. And find someone to be accountable to, be it a mentor, another business pal that you can trust, or a banker. I hope this was helpful. I’ll write more later this week, but if there are things you’d like me to touch on, comment below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

The grand reveal of the new offices at BabyLove!

I’ve been hinting here and there about the construction being done to add to the office space and practitioners who are now collected at BabyLove, but I haven’t had any video tours like I did when I did the buildout of suite 102 last year. There’s more to the story about the reclaiming of suite 200 and the remodeling than you’d think. The video is long, but I hope you enjoy it.

We are having a Great-Grand Opening on May 2nd, 2015 from 1-3pm. If you can’t make it, but would like to know more about the nonprofit we’ve formed to improve maternity care outcomes for families in our area and would like to help our fundraising campaign we’re doing to pay for the initial filing fees, you can find that information here.

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

“I had no idea!”: Unrealistic Expectations for Pregnancy, Birth, and Baby

unrealistic expectations

There’s a common theme that I hear over and over and over: parents experience a huge disconnect between what they expect versus reality, and they find that very upsetting, irritating, and frustrating. Some of these unrealistic expectations are deeply ingrained into our popular narrative about what it means to become parents. This narrative is reinforced by fictional portrayals of pregnancy, birth, and parenting, and large commercial forces exist to profit off of these. It’s time to change that. And while there may be the rare case where these assumptions and intentions are met, those situations are not the norm. So, listed below, are seven of the most common scenarios I run across:

1) Your prenatal visits will have lots of time to answer all of your questions and are enough to teach you everything you need to know about giving birth. Prenatal visits can last anywhere from 5 to 30 minutes or more, and are entirely clinic and provider specific. In high-volume clinics, short appointments are not uncommon. Additionally, a recent study found that many moms did not fully understand what their doctors or midwives were telling them.

2) The care provider you saw during pregnancy will be there during birth. Depending on the provider’s specialty and practice structure (Individual, small group, large group), you’re most likely to be at the mercy of their call rotation schedule. With the exception of the practices that work on a rotating call basis with care providers at the hospital or birth center during an entire shift, or if they happen to have a chance to pop in earlier, you won’t see a doctor or midwife until you’re pushing–and then, who shows up may be a surprise.

3) A nurse will be there to help guide an support you through the entire birth. First of all, a nurse’s primary job is to keep tabs on the health and well-being of baby and mom throughout the labor. They are also required to document heartbeats, blood pressures, temperatures, cervical checks, etc. And while in many cases,  best practice is to have staffing ratios that allows for one nurse to be taking care of one mom in active labor, some hospitals are more likely to have much lower staffing ratios; some Twin Cities hospitals have one nurse for every 2 or 3 mom in labor.

4) An epidural is guaranteed to work (and everyone can have one). Not all women are able to have epidurals– and your doctor or midwife may not catch that ahead of time. Also, epidurals only work perfectly about 80% of the time. No matter what your goals for pain medication are, it’s good to know about other options–just in case.

5) Having a birth plan is enough communication of your preferences. Birth time is NOT battle time. While you are in labor, you don’t need to be using that time to negotiate over the things that are important to you. While nobody knows what your birth will be like, you need to go over your preferences with your doctor or midwife. They should be willing to listen to your concerns and what’s important to you. If they are dismissive or tell you what you want won’t matter, it’s time to think about finding a provider who will be flexible (as you should be, too) to wait until labor unfolds.

6) You won’t need any postpartum help. A new baby is way more overwhelming than most people expect. The baby takes a lot of care and attention, and mom will need 2-4 weeks to really recover from birth, so everything else can quickly get out of hand. Groceries need bought, food needs made, dishes need to get done, laundry needs washed, etc., etc., etc. Ask for help! If you can’t coordinate help via friends, family, coworkers, or church community, then consider hiring a postpartum doula.

7) Your baby’s doctor will help you achieve your breastfeeding goals. The reality is, very few pediatricians covered breastfeeding for more than a few hours in med school. They don’t often seek out breastfeeding education after they start practicing, either. When you take the lack of knowledge base, a common desire to be able to measure every single thing, including how much a baby is eating, and an inherent distrust in the ability of women’s bodies, it’s no wonder so many women give up breastfeeding at the direction of the pediatrician. Some providers so have a passion for breastfeeding, so choose that doctor or nurse practitioner very, very carefully.

Those were the ones I came up with. What else did I miss?

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

BabyLove Welcomes: Sarah Leitschuh, MA, LMFT

Note from Veronica: I am excited to announce 4 new practitioners who will be joining us at BabyLove. They will be practicing in the gorgeous new offices that were put into BabyLove’s original home in Suite 200. I am thrilled to say that all of these women have a passion for working with other disciplines and to help and support women and families. Here’s one fantastic provider!

IMG_0638

Sarah Leitschuh is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Sarah is passionate about supporting families by offering therapy and educational workshops. Sarah provides individual, family and couples therapy. Topics commonly addressed in therapy include; depression, anxiety, behavioral concerns in children, communication, conflict resolution and helping parents be on the same page in making parenting decisions. The workshops that Sarah provides are primarily for parents and address topics such as; children’s emotions, communicating with teens, helping children develop healthy social skills and self care for caregivers. Sarah is also a wife, mother of two young children and owner of an energetic dog.

Sarah specializes in providing therapy for children and adolescents and their families. Sarah also specializes in supporting parents through her therapeutic services and workshops.

Potential clients are invited to visit her website (www.sarahleitschuhcounseling.com) for more information.   To schedule an appointment, she can be reached at sarah@sarahleitschuhcounseling.com or 952-457-2322.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Used car seats aren’t a good deal

dangerous used car seats

“Another post about used car seats?”

Yes. Another post about used car seats. Like much of parenting, there’s the inherent instinct to dismiss professional advice as being overly-cautious or self-serving. And babies can be expensive, so clearly it’s all a scam to get parents to pay more money for more junk that they don’t need, right?

Um…..no.

If this post didn’t convince you that used car seats should be used with caution, here are 6 things I want you to think about:

  1. That used seat may be hard to install or use correctly- Over time, manufacturers make upgrades to the design of their car seats. In theory, as they get smarter about design and use, they make the seats easier to use. Some older or inexpensive car seats may be very hard to adjust the straps so that they are tight enough, which means your baby wouldn’t stay secured in the car seat in the event of a sudden stop or crash. It’s also VERY common for used car seats to have stuck or difficult lower anchor adjustments, making it so you can’t tighten the seat’s install enough.
  2. That used car seat may have gone through an unreasonably high amount of wear and tear- Something we look for as CPSTs when looking at used seats to to see if the shell of the seat has been weakened or compromised in any way. It’s pretty common to find that a seat has gone through an excessive amount of stress and has weak points in critical parts of it. These weak points may mean that the shell breaks at the belt path or at the harness slots if placed under any extreme force.
  3. Seats get recalled- When a family has a used car seat sitting in the basement or garage, they may not notice if a recall has been issued on a seat (this is why registering products is critical). It’s not uncommon to come across recalls when using previously used seats. Some recalls render the seat useless, some require a fix, and some just address seat usage. Whatever it is, these are key to take into account.
  4. The previous owner didn’t care for the seat properly- Car seats can stop working if not cared for in the correct manner. Using bleach on webbing can lead to the straps breaking down, causing them to be very weak. Failure to clean moving parts according to manufacturer’s instruction can cause them to seize up and no longer work. Clips and tabs can break off over time. It’s important to take these possibilities seriously.
  5. The car seat has been put together incorrectly- I don’t have any hard and fast statistics on this, but it’s VERY common for a seat that’s been used over a length of time to have the various straps and buckles twisted, threaded through the seat the wrong way, or to have parts of the seat backwards or in the wrong place. Without a thorough knowledge of how seats should work, you may not be able to determine if a seat has problems that need to be fixed.
  6. The car seat is too dirty to salvage-  Babies are messy. Spit-up, vomit, poo, crumbs–lots of things end up in a car seat. Usually, the car seat cover can be removed and washed (usually on delicate, but always follow the manufacturer’s instructions), but other things like buckles and straps often can only be cleaned with warm water and mild detergent.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I can understand that the expense of a car seat can seem very overwhelming. However, there are good ways to spend those dollars in a way that is both wise and safe and that is useful for a long length of time. After all, it’s better to spend $200 on one seat that your child can use until he’s 6 or 7 years old than to buy 4 seats at $75-$100 or more each time to get to that same age.  We’re talking about something that can protect your child from the leading cause of death for kids. That’s something to value.

The National Highway and Transportation and Safety Administration has some very good resources that can be helpful to understand the complicated topic of car seats. Check it out, and let me know if you have questions!

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

You’re pregnant! Now what?

I_m pregnant

So both little lines turned pink. Yay! You’re pregnant. Now, after you pee on 3 more sticks just to make sure, sit down for a bit to wrap your head around all of it, call a few people (or not)….what do you do?

1) Don’t assume you need to run to the same OB you’ve been seeing since you were 15 ASAP. First of all, there’s really very little to do at that 4-8 week mark, medically speaking. Also….are you SURE you want that OB/ OB practice to take care of you during your pregnancy and birth? Some care providers treat every patient the same, without taking into consideration that every mom and baby are different. Where you give birth is one of the biggest predictors of your birth outcomeAsk questions. Get numbers. And don’t stop until you find someone that you feel 110% comfortable with….even if you’re changing at 41 weeks.

2) Don’t panic. If you are feeling scared or overwhelmed, though, reach out for help. Talk to your therapist, religious guide, family, friends, or your partner. It’s ok to take awhile to get used to the idea of parenthood, and making sure you have realistic expectations can make a difference in how you are prepared for the ongoing changes a child brings.

3) Realize you don’t need to figure everything out right away. Maybe 9 months doesn’t sound like long, but so much can change. New jobs, new cities….there is always a chance you’ll have new doors and windows open.

4) Start setting aside money for the two things that will make the most difference in your birth: hiring a doula and taking childbirth classes. Both are critical. Both allow you to be ready for the unexpected and can help you have a safer, healthier. And really—those two things will matter more to you in 50 years than a crazy-expensive crib or any other baby items.

5) Breathe. Eat well. Drink lots of water. Stay active. Yes, in a few months your waistline will expand, but both you and your baby will have better outcomes the healthier you are during your pregnancy.

I hope some of these things are helpful. If you have any other good tips on how best to handle those first couple of months of pregnancy, I’d love to hear them!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

When is the best time to get an epidural?

After a conversation Crystal and I had last week about epidurals, we decided to have the same conversation again, but this time on camera.

Sorry about the odd framing. I’ll set up the shot better next time.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Social media, the internet, and motherhood: The good, the bad, and the ugly

social media

This is a blog post I’ve been wanting to write since I got home from the Lamaze/DONA Confluence last month. The last two conferences I went to spent a TON of time covering social media basics. I’m on social media personally and professionally. BabyLove has a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a Google Plus page, an account on Pinterest, and is on Instagram, too. Me, personally, for the human being behind the smiling avitar….I like twitter (though my no-nonsense, very straightforward, always honest tweets don’t always land well.)

We’ve all had to grapple with the really crummy parts of the internet and social media. I know we know they are there. But I still want to take some time to touch on some things that I’ve been thinking about for the last month, especially in relation to pregnancy and motherhood.

The Good:

OK, so there are some really great things that social media can do for pregnant and new moms. I look at the various tongue tie support groups out there and know that if it weren’t for the internet and social media, we wouldn’t have so much progress in a movement that’s been parent-driven. It’s so grassroots, so worldwide…it would have never moved forward without Facebook groups and websites. Truthfully, it would have gone nowhere, as no community would ever be able to gain enough momentum on its own.

Sometimes social media can put you into contact with people you NEVER would have otherwise been able to meet and get to know. In my case, Twitter is where my people (AKA Tweeps) are. It’s where I’ve met people who I genuinely like and enjoy chatting with, even though I’ve only met a tiny handful IRL (That’s “in real life” if you didn’t know.) And the nice thing about twitter, too, is that there are things like #ppdchat that exist to help new moms navigate the challenges of coping with our ever-changing lives. While Facebook isn’t always a great place if you want to stick to civil discussions, there have been a few times where it’s made me like someone more. And for those of us who are very, very busy moms, it can be one of the few ways we can connect with each other in any way, shape, or form.

To sum it up: not all of us become mothers with a super tight group of women surrounding us. Some of us are introverts. Some of us have social anxiety that can make going to playgroups absolutely hellish. However, thanks to the internet we can get that connection, interaction, and support we need to keep up afloat in even the choppiest water.

The Bad:

As I wrote in my previous post about not googling your birth, the internet and social media is full of way too many opinions and it’s hard to find the facts. So while it may seem easier to search for an answer yourself, it can quickly get to be too much. I’m sure your social media connections are perfectly fine people, but again– you’re just getting a lot of opinions. Now, for superficial things, like where to buy clothes for your child or ideas for parks to go to, opinions are fine. But when it comes to your health and wellbeing or your child’s health and safety, you NEED to find people who know what they are talking about. If you take someone’s opinion and they were wrong…that’s bad.

The Ugly:

You know what’s coming: the trolling, the name calling, the bullying…and I’m talking about adults, not teenagers! Because SO MUCH of motherhood that we hold near and dear (specifically birth and breastfeeding) isn’t controlled by what WE want as women and mothers, but rather by the doctors, midwives, nurses, and lactation professionals we come into contact with, when we have lost our say in the outcomes, we feel small, violated, and wronged. It’s from THAT place of anger that I think most of the vitriol stems. And it’s fair to be angry when we go to someone we trust and they refuse to help. It’s just not fair to transfer that anger to innocent women in that mommy Facebook group.

Then there will always be those moms who get a kick out of stirring up anger and controversy, spreading gossip, using social media to target moms that…OK, you know what? I don’t know why those women behave that way. Having been that target, all I know is that it sucks. I’m sure someone who specializes in this area of things would be able to articulate it better, but I find those moms are usually dealing with a huge amount of anger, a lack of self-esteem, or they just get their kicks out of manipulating other people. I don’t have any easy answers for that, especially if they are people you know IRL.

Bottom line? Being a mom is isolating in about a million ways. If you’re struggling with Postpartum Depression, Anxiety, or just floundering in general, there are some amazing resources out there. But do not belittle, name call, stalk, or harass other moms. I’m not saying you would, but…just don’t do it. And if you ask the internets for help, do so from a place that’s genuinely open to what you’ll get back. If you need to whine about something, whine away…just don’t ask for help when all you really want to say is, “THIS SUCKS.”

Of course, it can take awhile to find your place. And do only what you are comfortable with–It’s hard enough to figure out who you are as an adult without throwing the sticky layer of motherhood on top of it.

That’s what I have for today. Be kind to yourself and others.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

How car seats are like birth

Yep. I fell off the #write31days train. You get a video today.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.