Taking the “Baby” out of MotherBaby

Biased

Another letter arrived last week from Children’s Hospital reminding me that they were in the middle of major negotiations with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. Reimbursement rates are the contentious issue, with one side that they need to pay less and they other saying they can’t afford to. As they got closer to a July deadline, I think it’s time for some straight talk about what this may mean. Not just to parents WITH kids earthside, but those parents planning to give birth at one of Allina’s cutely named “MotherBaby Centers”.

OK, I’m no fan of Allina, something I made abundantly clear during both strikes, as well as pointing out that they have engaged in the exact same kind of bait and switch that got a mom a massing legal settlement last year. Should Children’s lose their BCBS contract, families who are planning to give birth at Abbott, United, or Mercy will be facing the possibility of facing financial ruin.

Crazy, right? But here’s the reality:

The “baby” part of the MotherBaby Center is handled by Children’s. If your little one ends up in Special Care or the NICU, all care is then given by Children’s. Now, in the past, this arrangement has already hurt families–Allina’s Lactation and Children’s Lactation Services are by no means equal. Lost in the shuffle, parents don’t get a very important nurse visit after they go home. Communication between two entities can be pretty awful.

But if you have BCBS insurance and are planning on giving birth at any Allina facility– or even a system that defaults all very serious NICU cases to Abbott (Unity’s NICU isn’t quite as robust)–here’s what a lack of contract deal would mean:

You give birth. In the chance that your baby needs extra care, your baby goes to a higher-level care facility. You may gave your birth paid for, but the baby’s care won’t be in network.

Let’s say a mom is on BluePlus– a Medical Assistance plan administered through an outside company. If that baby goes to the Special Care Nursery or the NICU—will the baby get turned away? Will the parents be separated from their kids?

Or let’s say the midwives at one of the Minnesota Birth Centers or Health Foundations decide a baby needs extra help. All of a sudden a family is facing huge costs from being forced to get care out of network.

Or, as I have learned, a mom with prenatal care at another hospital system shows up at Abbott or United because the marketing makes it seem like a better choice, will they end up going through hell if they don’t end up with a healthy baby?

Do you see how this works?

Look, I’m not a huge fan of BCBS. They are doing some pretty wackadoo things to providers. They haven’t always been my favorite as a patient. But Children’s? With your stupid galas and fundraising? Have you thought this through?

Probably not. As is usually the case, the powers that be at the top think of the birthing patients and their babies last. I mean, after all–what’s screwing over a bunch of families if it means they have more money? It’s better to hurt the smallest patients than have a smaller bottom line, right?

Wrong.

-Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Announcing Twin Cities Hospital Birth Costs at a Glance!

After last year’s epic process of compiling costs for births and newborn care, I was trying to figure out a more accessible way for parents to get the 2015 data. So, I created a more streamlined guide-at-a-glance.

This guide has a few features: health system affiliation is listed, allowing you to see how they differ in cost from company to company. It’s just two pages, making it easy to flip back and forth. I had fun compiling the information, and I hope you find it useful!

Warmly,

Veronica

Get your copy of Twin Cities Hospital Birth Costs at a Glance

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

The Allina Strike: Another Mom’s Warning

Veronica: I’ve been continuing to collect stories from moms who gave birth during the June strike at Allina hospitals. Another strike started today at 7am. Staffing levels are lower than in the last strike. Not all birth workers share this sentiment, but going to a hospital during a strike is risky. Talk to your doctor or midwife, with the caveat that many of them didn’t take the last strike seriously. Contact me if you have questions, concerns, or stories you’d like for me to share here.

Below, a story from Jessica, shared in it’s entirety with permission.

Upon walking through the doors of Abbotts Mother Baby Center in Minneapolis on June 19th, a cold and erry feeling came over me. The feeling of walking through an abandoned building, the uniforms were different; almost like guards in a prison. I never saw a smile– only the faces of replacements looking confused, frazzled and pressured. Wasn’t this suppose to be the happiest and most friendly place welcoming new life? Not here.
After patiently waiting for my name to be called, bags in tow and my husband by my side, we were lead down an empty hall into a room and simpy left alone. My contractions were fierce, I was hurting with tears of pain, not joy. And finally we were joined by a women who couldn’t explain why we couldn’t hear my son’s heartbeat until she was assisted by another 2 women. He was of course healthy as could be! It was then confirmed, we were having a baby on Fathers Day! My husband was thrilled to have a healthy son born on his day!

But we couldn’t get over the fact of how inadequate the replacements were. Once we arrived in our 2nd room, it was time to be hooked up to countless machines and ivs. It took my nurse and 2 other women with 4 times and blood everywhere to correctly place my IV; it was a bloody mess. My husband had to direct the many women who tried to help but thankfully my husband knew where the blankets were, and many other things in the room were that were needed to comfort his wife and mother of his children.

It was only 7 hours after being admitted that I heard the sweet cry of my baby boy, never was he placed on my chest, never was he cleaned from the mucus covering his sweet glowing skin. I still kissed him and the mess didn’t matter. I was never guided to breast feed, I was never escorted to the bathroom to clean myself, luckily my husband had been through this and helped me. My epidural was not effective , so I was able to care for myself immediately. I don’t think we saw a nurse for almost 2.5 hours after delivery, we enjoyed the time alone but knew I was missing something.

As the nurses prepared to do the newborn screening, my son began to choke and I had to direct the nurse to please help my baby breathe, and they immediately started to do the newborn screening- it took almost a half an hour and 3 attempts to get him to bleed enough to complete the pallet. As we sat there helpless listening to the screams of my baby, I was broken inside. Needless to say, we very adamantly pushed to go home after 24 hours; we knew we could care for our baby alone in the comforts of our home as a family of 5. Since then, we have watched our son grow into a beautiful healthy baby.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

About that Alabama birth settlement…

Last week, a mom in Alabama was awarded $16 million by a jury to compensate her for damage; they found the hospital “violated the standard of care for labor and delivery and participated in reckless misrepresentation of fact.” Evidently, the hospital had a pattern of what the jury described as “Bait and switch”. Of note was that they hospital’s advertising touted waterbirth until At least July of 2015, even though water birth had been banned since January of 2013.

Waterbirth bans happen. In April of 2014 in response to one of the dumbest, most illogical opinions ever published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Allina hospitals banned waterbirths. At the time, I blogged about the controversy, writing,

Rebecca Dekker over at Evidence Based Birth does a really good job talking about the evidence to support (or not support) the practice of allowing women to labor in a tub and to give birth in the tub. I’m not going to reinvent the wheel, so go read it on her website. The upshot? This isn’t an easy thing to study due to logistics and ethical standards, but it has been studied. It’s been studied enough that the practice is considered safe throughout much of Europe. And guess what? Their water works the same there as it does here.

So, here’s the problem: According to an archived copy of The MotherBaby Center’s (really just Abbot Northwestern, an Allina Hospital) website from June 6th, 2014, waterbirth was still an option.

Waterbirth

Despite the fact that there was ample media coverage of the waterbirth ban, this page is, essentially, the very same bait and switch that the Alabama hospital was sued over. Waterbirth is being actively marketed, but it is not available.

This is not OK. It isn’t OK in Alabama, and it isn’t OK here.

While it’s true that Alabama ranks as one of the worst states in which to give birth in the US, with very poor outcomes for both moms and babies, cases like what this mom experienced happen all the time. As a doula, I have witnessed obstetric violence. I have been in the room as OBs told moms that if they didn’t comply, their babies would die. I have seen moms get episiotomies even though they explicitly stated that they did not consent. Some of these cases happened at hospitals that otherwise had good cesarean rates. Many of these actually happened while a patient was under the care of Nurse Midwives. Backlash from the medical community in response to last week’s verdict was severe; some doctors claimed that this verdict was not actually a victory for birthing families, but that hospitals would respond by caring even less about what her patients wanted and refusing even more obstetric choices. However, it’s important to point out that it took one mom who knew her options and knew her rights to stand up.

As expectant parents, it’s on your shoulders to take responsibility for making informed choices. Looking at a website and marketing is not making an informed choice. Staying blissfully unaware of the ins and outs of the maternity care system IS NOT assuming any responsibility for the outcome of your pregnancy and birth. You are the ones who need to ask questions. Put as much time researching your options as you spend researching cribs. Find out the difference between the different kinds of doctors and midwives that provide care. Look at freestanding birth centers. Tour hospitals and for heaven’s sake– ASK QUESTIONS. If they say they have waterbirth, ask to know the average times they use it a month. They know. If you must, tell them that you want to make sure what they market is really available.  And on the flip side, every single time something like the above happens, we need to make sure lots of people point it out and stay critical of it. Hold both marketing and maternity services to the highest standards. If nobody says anything, nothing will change.

In the MSP and surrounding communities, the voices of patients can and have produced profound change. And as much as I want to paint birth as a magical, shiny, unicorn-filled time, reality doesn’t always match that. Let’s talk about when it sucks, and when the places and people we trust create trauma, we need to raise our voices.

If you’ve seen a bait and switch in maternity care, I’d like to hear about it.

Warmly,

Veroniva

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

What the Allina Nurse Strike Means for Birthing Families

Given the news that nurses at 5 Allina hospitals are set to strike starting Saturday Sunday, there are a few things to keep in mind if you’re due soon and are facing the chances of going in to give birth and were planning to have your baby at United, Abbott, or Mercy, there are some things you should be aware of.

The replacement nurses will be trained in Labor and Delivery. That’s the good news. The bad news is that they will bring in their own ideas, which will very likely be very different than the hospitals regular protocols and policies. We have far better outcomes in Minnesota than, say, the South. Many of these nurses will be coming from areas with very high c-section rates, where waterbirth is banned, where there are de facto VBAC bans, etc. Be aware that you may face huge opposition from your nurse if she’s not normally around these things that families in Minnesota have come to expect as the norm.

Also, when replacements are brought in to any strike situation and cross the picket line, patient safety becomes a concern. Nurses unfamiliar with even where various items are kept or who will be struggling with an unfamiliar Electronic Health Record system won’t be able to provide the same level of care that the staff nurses can provide. Also, if staffing agencies had a hard time recruiting enough L&D nurses, patient ratios may be even worse than normal– a long time sticking point between the nurses union and Allina.

So, what can you do if you’re facing an impending strike and you’re days away from birth?

If you have the option to give birth at a non-Allina hospital with your current maternity care practice, do so. If you don’t have a non-Allina option, speak with your doctor (and since Allina is the only hospital group without a midwife group, it’s probably just a doctor that you have) about how he or she is planning to help keep patients safe during the strike. Will they be spending more time in the hospital while patients are laboring?

And even at this late stage, consider hiring a doula. She can’t provide medical care, but she will be able to be another set of eyes and hands and can help protect your birth, even with replacement nurses. It may be possible to hire a private doula, but I can get families birth doulas my non-profit. Our fees are on a sliding scale, too. You can find more info here.

It was stressful for patients during the last widespread strike, even though that strike only lasted 24 hours. Hospital administrators will always spin things to try to reassure patients, but parents have a right to understand that things won’t be the same.

If you have any specific questions, post them in the comment section!

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

On Music and Motherhood

This has been a weird week of balance for me. I’m running everything at BabyLove on my own– Lora, my other educator, had her baby earlier this month. She also does the books around here, so….it’s interesting. My grandmother has been ill, and I do a lot to take care of her and visit her, so that’s been difficult. It’s been interesting to find my footing in this situation. I’m the granddaughter. I have two young kids who I still need to take care of. And then yesterday, while I was working on financials and grants with my friend for The BabyLove Alliance, Ltd., came the sad news that Prince passed away.

I am heartbroken.

I’ve been trying so hard to process everything that’s going on, but I wanted to share a piece of me and my identity as a mom with you.

One of the things that most people don’t talk about is that when you become a parent, especially a mom, for the first time, your entire identity gets shredded and you have to instantly begin this very long process of giving up parts of who you are and replacing it with new things. It’s a very, very painful process. We all go through it, we just don’t talk about it. And while I want to talk about that loss and that mourning, what I really want to focus on is what happens on the other side of this process: You get to build your life as an individual again.

For me, it happened when I knew my youngest was going to go to preschool starting that fall. That was 5 years ago. That realization is what created BabyLove. But another part of who I am blossomed: the part of me who dove straight into music. I developed a deep love of Arcade Fire, even attending their Reflektor concert with a friend I met here at BabyLove. I made a little video of my finger dressed up like Billy Idol and won the very last pair of tickets into his acoustic show at the Turf Club. In the last year, I’ve attended more concerts that I have collectively in my life. Jeremy Messersmith getting blood from his zombie costume on his guitar? Best Halloween ever.

But one of the COOLEST things that’s come from this is that I’ve been able to share my love of music with my kids. They know things I didn’t at their ages: they have a decent grasp on the career of The Beatles. They have songs that they love to dance to in the kitchen with me. After I found a bunch of Roger Miller albums on vinyl, they started to listen to them with me. Now they know all the words to classics like “King of the Road” and “Chug-a-lug.” My daughter even informed us that one of our favorite Roger Miller songs was actually about him killing himself. Oops. I was also really excited when I found the Monkees album with “Zilch” on it, which…..oh, never mind.

I have shared with my son my deep, deep, deeeeeeep love of Queen. He now spends his days with Queen music blaring in his room. We have talks about Freddie, and Brian, and Roger. We talk about the music videos. We talk about their discography. We talk about the tribute concerts, and we talk about Adam Lambert. And you know what? That’s been really cool to connect with him like that.

Last summer, my youngest sister and I took my daughter with us to Rock the Garden. Once of the art museums co-host this event with a local radio station, and one of the acts was one that both my daughter and I adore. Taking my daughter with us was AWESOME. She had a blast, we had a blast introducing her to the finer points of concert-going, like smelly porta-potties and ear plug options. It was so fun to be doing something that makes me so very joyful, and watching her also respond with so much joy she was almost exploding.

SO MUCH JOY!!!!!!
SO MUCH JOY!!!!!!

So while I mourn Prince today, I will be thankful for the joy his music brought me the last couple of years as I figured out who I am as a mom, wife, and woman. And this morning, as I cranked the radio and rocked out with my son to Prince’s music, I’m thankful to find this part of me and to share it with others.

I’m rocking the purple today. Take care of yourselves, and be kind.

Warmly,

Veronica

Purple Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

2015 Twin Cities Medical Group Primary Cesarean Rates

I’m a big nerd when it comes to birth data. Maybe you’ve noticed. So when new information becomes available, it’s like Christmas to me. Yesterday, I figured out that MN Community Measurement had finally released their 2015 Health Care Quality Report. For the second year in a row, they reported Primary Cesarean rates by Medical Group.

So, some good news. The State’s rate of primary cesarean dropped from 22.2% to 21.9%. After a decade of rapid increases in cesarean rates, this is just another measure that shows we’re going in the right direction. Whee!

OK, time for the real stuff. From highest rates to lowest, here’s what the report has for Medical Groups. For comparison, I put the rate from 2014’s report in parentheses.

  1. Allina Health Specialties- 34.7% (27.9%)
  2. Comprehensive Healthcare for Women- 33.0% (30.5%)
  3. Western OBGYN- 29.2% (26.1%)
  4. OBGYN West-27.9% (24.1%)
  5. Women’s Health Consultants- 27.0% (24.9%)
  6. Metropolitan OBGYN- 26.0% (29.5%)
  7. Partners OBGYN- 25.2% (27%)
  8. Clinic Sofia- 25.1% (25.1%)
  9.  Obestetrics and Gynecology Associates- 24.8% (21.9%)
  10. Hennepin County Medical Center Clinics -24.7% (19.1%)
  11. Fairview Health Services- 23.5% (24.8%)
  12. Adefris and Toppin Women’s Specialists- 21.9% (27%)
  13. Healthpartners Clinics- 21.7% (n/a)
  14. Allina Health Clinics- 21.6% (25.8%)
  15. Southdale OBGyn Consultants- 21.5% (21.6%)
  16. Park Nicollet Health Services- 20.1% (19.2%)
  17. North Clinic- 19.6% (24.4%)
  18. Multicare Associates- 19.3% (29.5%)
  19. U of M Physicians-18.4% (17.3%)
  20. Oakdale OBGYN- 16.3% (18.7%)
  21. John A Haugen Associates- 16.2% (21.2%)
  22. Hudson Physicians- Minnesota Healthcare Network- 14.9% (11.8%)
  23. AALFA Family Clinic- 4.7% (13.0%)

You can read the full report for 2015 here.

Coming up in the next post, I’ll share my thoughts on some of these numbers. In the meantime, enjoy!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

When your breastfed baby won’t accept a bottle

baby wont take bottle

One of the biggest questions I get during breastfeeding class is, “when can I introduce my baby to the bottle?’ And while the answer is different for everyone depending on their situations, there’s one thing that doesn’t come up enough: When breastfed babies reject a bottle. When that happens, it’s frustrating for moms because they feel like they can’t leave their babies, and it’s frustrating for dads and other caregivers because the bottle rejection can feel so personal. So, here are some things you can try if you’re in this situation.

Please note: If your baby is simply not eating anything in any form for a length of time, please seek immediate, appropriate medical care.

  • Is the milk yucky?–Sometimes I forget to ask moms if they’ve had a chance to taste the milk that they have pumped. Sometimes, the pumped milk, due to an excess of lipase (which we dont really understand why this is the case for some moms), can end up tasting or smelly soapy. Kellymom.com has a great set of instructions to help you make your milk more palatable if this is what you’re dealing with.
  • Try a different bottle–Not all bottle are created equal, and even the (unfounded) marketing claims make it hard to figure out what kind of bottle to use for your baby. What I usually tell moms is that usually simpler is better, and a wider bottle is better. No matter what, I’d discourage any mom from making the choice for kind of bottles without baby’s input. He or she will let you know what he likes. One note: It may seem like a faster flow nipple will be better, but if your baby is already leery of bottles, a fast flow can end up coming out too fast and result in scaring your baby, compounding the issue.
  • Try movement– some babies need to be distracted into taking a bottle. the person giving baby a bottle may need to walk, swing, bounce, or sway while trying to feed baby. Some babies need to be sung to while being fed. Some babies prefer to look out of a window, while others may prefer to sit in the dark. Try all of these things– you never know what will work.
  • Try different temperatures of milk– it may seem like the best choice is to heat up the breastmilk to body temperature, but some babies get very upset when the milk is the right temp– but there’s no mom attached to the milk. If this is the case, try cold milk, try milk that’s warmer than body temp (but not hot), and see if any of those changes help.
  • Try something other than a bottle– Bottles are relatively new inventions in the scheme of things. Sometimes the best way to feed a baby who won’t take a bottle is to use something else to feed baby. Cups and spoons are two common things used to feed babies. And rather than me try to explain how to do it here or to send you out to the great web to find information, here’s a great playlist someone already put together of some really great videos:  Again, patience is the key.

If you find yourself in the predicament, it can be helpful to seek good lactation help, too. Sometimes having another brain in the mix can help you figure out what’s going on.

Have you dealt with this? Do you have any ideas? Share below!

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Where to go to prevent tearing

vaginal tears

Awhile back, I did a quick post on a few of the rates of tears at different hospitals in the Twin Cities area. The info has been slightly updated, and I decided to pull the information for all of the area hospitals.

A few notes: The website that lists this information doesn’t specify what degree of perineal tears they are talking about. Tears are rated first degree, second degree, third degree, and fourth degree. First and second degree tears can be pretty common. Most epidemiological discussions about tears focus only on 3rd degree tears and second degree tears. I’m hoping to get some clarification on what the heck they are talking about when they say “tears”, and I’ll update this post as I can.

Perineum Tears: Rates for Vaginal Deliveries without Instruments; for some reason, St. Joseph’s is missing.

Lowest rates to highest:

  1. Shakopee- 1%
  2. Ridgeview- 1%
  3. St. John’s- 1%
  4. HCMC- 2%
  5. Lakeview-2%
  6. Unity- 2%
  7. Regions- 2%
  8. North Memorial- 2%
  9. Mercy Hospital- 2%
  10. University of Minnesota- 3%
  11. United- 3%
  12. Regina- 3%
  13. Ridges- 3%
  14. Methodist- 3%
  15. Northfield- 4%
  16. Woodwinds- 4%
  17. Southdale- 4%
  18. Maple Grove- 4%
  19. The MotherBaby Center/ Abbott Northwestern- 5%

Perineum Tears: Rates for Vaginal Deliveries with Instruments

Lowest rates to highest:

  1. Regina- 0%
  2. University of Minnesota- 5%
  3. Hennepin County Medical Center- 10%
  4. St. John’s- 10%
  5. Woodwinds- 10%
  6. Regions- 12%
  7. Unity- 12%
  8. St. Joseph’s- 13%
  9. Southdale- 13%
  10. Northfield- 13%
  11. United- 14%
  12. Shakopee-15%
  13. Ridges- 16%
  14. North Memorial Medical Center- 16%
  15. Mercy- 19%
  16. Methodist- 24%
  17. Ridgeview- 27%
  18. Maple Grove- 20%
  19. The MotherBaby Center/ Abbott Northwestern- 24%

Beyond choosing your care provider and place where you give birth with a lot of thought and care, make sure you know the different ways you can make pushing and birth as safe as possible. Check out our Confident Birth and Beyond (Lamaze) classes, too, to learn how to have a safe and healthy birth.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Why the cheapest car seat is usually a waste of money

Yesterday, I hopped onto a video stream to talk about this cheap car seat I’d been holding on to for the last month. Check it out! And if you need help with car seats, schedule your appointment with me today!

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.