Privacy, promotion, and the ethical limits to business growth

Soapbox Friday! Yay! Two issues have reared their ugly heads this week, and I think it’s time for a gentle reminder that it’s imperative that we all understand the importance and limits created by certain laws and codes. I am talking about the HIPAA Privacy Act and the International Code of Breast-Milk Substitutes. One is a federal law that carries with it fines and imprisonment, the other is a code that some organizations require their members to follow, otherwise they can be stripped of their certifications. In both cases, the need to uphold these standards trumps any marketing considerations.

HIPAA Privacy Act

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has a really helpful summary of the act, and in the introduction, it broadly defines HIPAA as:

The Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information (“Privacy Rule”) establishes, for the first time, a set of national standards for the protection of certain health information. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) issued the Privacy Rule to implement the requirement of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”).1 The Privacy Rule standards address the use and disclosure of individuals’ health information—called “protected health information” by organizations subject to the Privacy Rule — called “covered entities,” as well as standards for individuals’ privacy rights to understand and control how their health information is used. Within HHS, the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has responsibility for implementing and enforcing the Privacy Rule with respect to voluntary compliance activities and civil money penalties.

Make sense? Sound fair enough? The big thing is the “control how their [the individuals’] health information is used.” Basically, not disclosing personal information in an improper manner. The other big issue with HIPAA is that there is a huge amount of misunderstanding about who this covers. Doctors and nurses and midwives in a hospital setting are obvious. Hospitals are required to have all employees trained in HIPAA compliance. Outside of that system, things may seem a little less obvious. But, again, from the Summary (emphasis mine):

Every health care provider, regardless of size, who electronically transmits health information in connection with certain transactions, is a covered entity. These transactions include claims, benefit eligibility inquiries, referral authorization requests, or other transactions for which HHS has established standards under the HIPAA Transactions Rule.6 Using electronic technology, such as email, does not mean a health care provider is a covered entity; the transmission must be in connection with a standard transaction. The Privacy Rule covers a health care provider whether it electronically transmits these transactions directly or uses a billing service or other third party to do so on its behalf. Health care providers include all “providers of services” (e.g., institutional providers such as hospitals) and “providers of medical or health services” (e.g., non-institutional providers such as physicians, dentists and other practitioners) as defined by Medicare, and any other person or organization that furnishes, bills, or is paid for health care.

So, yes, this does cover providers who are not hospital based. It does cover doulas. It covers birthcenters. It covers homebirth midwives. It covers childbirth educators. All of them in one way or another get paid for health care. Doulas have been fighting, rightly so, for recognition of the profession as a legitimate one, but with that comes the responsibility to uphold professional standards such as HIPAA. Social media seems to be the largest source of violations that I see. Over the last few years I have seen numerous debates on the subject. Common reasons professionals use for sharing patient information include claims that the parents want to see it, that it’s a good marketing tool, and that they aren’t actually revealing personal information. If you’re using photos, as long as you have proper written permission, that’s fine.  That’s not revealing personal health information. (Although I find the common practice of posting “trophy” pictures on websites from every single birth a little off-putting.) The real violation comes when certain pages post birth weights, date and time of birth, gender, and even parent and sibling information online. In some cases, the information is specific enough that the exact identity of the patient could be surmised from the posts.  This is CLEARLY illegal, and with such violations come fines– BIG fines. More importantly, as is the case with many ethical issues (the criminal aspect of this notwithstanding), when care providers show such blatant disrespect for patient privacy and federal law, it casts doubt on their competency overall. No matter how you try to rationalize it, even out of hospital birth pros NEED to respect patient privacy, period.

The International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes

This topic has reared it’s ugly little head in the community again, and I have a nice little video that you can watch to understand the “WHO Code”, what it covers, and why.

If an event is underwritten by a company the violates the WHO-Code, it’s imperative that health care professionals with a code of ethics that addresses WHO Code compliance adhere to their professional standards.  And despite the common attempt to skirt the issue with the refrain of “I just want to support all mothers,” PLEASE realize that has NOTHING to do with supporting or not supporting mothers. It’s about the billions of dollars spent by big food conglomerates and big pharma to pass along misinformation and to influence mothers and health providers alike.  Finally, WHO-Code violating companies know that the promise of financial gain is enough to woo health care professionals to ignore the rules and like to fuel the fire of the “mommy wars” to help them undermine breastfeeding supporters.

Find more information on the WHO-Code via the following resources:

The Code in it’s entirety

A really great summary on The Code on Snugabell

The Standards of Practice for Certified Lactation Counselors (See “Q”)

Lamaze International’s stance on “The Code”

Bottom line? As with the HIPAA rules, the very second you start to try to justify legal or ethical violations in the name of marketing or financial support, you’re making a bad choice. It’s simply not worth it, and families deserve better.

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Guest Post: It’s not the Method, it’s the Mother.

Veronica: I met Deena Blumenfeld, owner of Shining Light Prenatal Education in Pittsburgh, at the Lamaze International Conference last October. The number of independent educators at the conference was small, and the number of women who owned our own businesses was even smaller. Last week, Deena wrote Book Review: “Lamaze: An International History” – Breath Control: The Rise and Decline of Psychoprophylaxis for the Science and Sensibility blog. That sparked a discussion between Deena and I about the current methods being taught in childbirth education and how they are modern versions of psychoprophalaxis. Below is a wonderful post Deena wrote on her blog in 2012 that so echos my feelings on “method-based” childbirth education.

Bradley, Hypnobabies, Brio Birth, Birthing from Within, Lamaze and so many others…Does it matter which flavor of childbirth education you take?  Maybe.

Every method has its benefits.  However, every method is not for every mother.  Not every mother needs a method; not every method will work for an individual mother.

I note that we all have different personalities and different learning styles.  We come from different socio-economic backgrounds.  Some of us have been abused during our lives and that will impact our needs during birth.

Some women need a more flexible class.  Others do need to know what to do at all stages of labor and birth; they need the method, the prescription.  If a woman feels more comfortable with a specific method for birth, then she should use it.  If she feels more comfortable knowing her options and selecting those that work best for her, then she should go with what she knows to be best.

Yes, I am a Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator (and proud of it!).  No, I don’t teach a method.  So, how does that work?  I teach the Lamaze Healthy Birth Practices.  I teach the evidence-based best practices.  I keep current with the research, studies and policy changes that are released.  I help my parents make informed choices regarding their pregnancies, births and babies.

I incorporate my yoga into class with the breathing I teach; the names of the postures and positions for labor and birth; the meditations, and visualizations come from my own experience.

I give women a selection of options from which they can choose to use, or not, as their body tells them.  I remind them not only to follow their body’s instincts, but to trust in their baby and their placenta to know how to give birth.

I do not prescribe certain breathing techniques for women to use.  Nor do I prescribe a series of positions for a woman to use during birth (like a certain Yoga Birthing method).  I do not prescribe any specific mantras, music or meditation.

Why not teach a method?  Why not give more specific instruction as to what to do when?  Because no one method will work for everyone.  There is no one right way to give birth.

If I tell you do X, Y and Z while breathing this way, I’ve stripped you of your autonomy.  I’ve taken away your ability to trust in the process of birth.

If I tell you do X, Y and Z while breathing this way and you fail to do it, for whatever reason, you will more than likely perceive your birth as a failure or perceive yourself as a failure.  This is simply not true.

The method failed, not the mother.

I work with pregnant women and new mothers all the time.  I run a yoga-based workshop called Healing from Traumatic Birth.  I’ve been teaching it for the last 3 years.  One thing that surprised me is the number of women who feel like failures because they didn’t have the “Bradley Birth”.  They “gave in” to the epidural, therefore their birth was traumatic.  Their mantras or affirmations weren’t enough to get them through, so they requested pain medication – and it was devastating for them.

Perception becomes reality.

These mothers perceive themselves as failures, therefore their births were traumatic.  Their perception is valid, their pain is valid.  However, this is not their fault.

This is a failure of the method, not the mother.  This is a failure of that educator, not the mother.  By not following through with an (somewhat) arbitrary set of predetermined, prescriptive behaviors, the woman perceives herself to have failed not only herself but her baby.

On the flip side when a birth is “successful”, and we credit the method we take the power away from the woman.  We strip her of her right to say “I DID IT!”  Instead we hear her say, “I couldn’t have done it without method X!”

In response to a shared birth story online:

Mom #1 – “Thanks so much for sharing! I love reading Hypnobabies stories since I’m using that method this time…

Mom #2 – “I agree. I of course thought it was awesome that it was a Hypnobabies story to…

My response – “Credit where credit is due. It’s not the method, it’s the mother. Kudos to her for birthing her baby the way he needed to be born.

It takes the power away from the mother to credit the method for her birth “success”.  To credit the method is called “advertising”.

About the author:

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Deena H. Blumenfeld, E-RYT 200, RPYT, LCCE is a Certified Khalsa Way™ Prenatal Yoga Teacher and Lamaze® Certified Childbirth Educator, Lamaze Trainer and the owner and lead educator here at Shining Light Prenatal Education

She has been practicing yoga since 1994.She became a certified Yoga instructor through 3rd Street Yoga in December 2008. She completed her 60 hour Prenatal Yoga training in February 2009 in Los Angeles at Golden Bridge Yoga with Gurmukh. Her Lamaze certification was completed in October 2010, through Magee Women’s Hospital and Lamaze International. She is an advocate of empowered birth for women.

Through the teaching of Prenatal Yoga and Childbirth Education classes, she helps women become more confident in their choices regarding pregnancy, birth and parenthood. Deena has also studied yoga with Doug Keller, Max Strom, KK Ledford, Shakta Kaur Khalsa and others. Her ongoing professional development as a Childbirth Educator has been with Ina May Gaskin, Penny Simkin, Gail Tully of Spinning Babies and other childbirth professionals.

Deena is also a mom of two – a son, born via c-section in April 2005, and a daughter in March 2009, a VBAC. She is an active member of the local ICAN chapter and a member of the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services.
Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

New Class Spotlight | Ready For Birth: Self-Study and Classroom Combo

Joining the two other Ready for Birth class formats is a brand new option: the Ready for Birth: Self-study and Classroom Combo.  This class utilizes the “flipped classroom” approach, so families who register will get a specially designed, exclusive-to-BabyLove series of lessons (including online resources and videos) to work through on their own at home, and then will attend a 3 hour in-class portion to answer questions and practice hands-on skills.

I first learned about this option at the Lamaze International Conference in New Orleans.  I’ve always been a little hesitant when it comes to online options, because one of the things I think parents who choose to forego traditional childbirth classes lose along the way is the ability to ask questions outside of the prenatal visits.  Let’s face it– it’s hard to remember to ask those questions when you’re sitting there, and even harder if your doctor or midwife only spends 5 minutes with you. But I do get that there are very motivated parents who do want to learn more on their own time and spend less time sitting through a lecture in a classroom.

The “Flipped Classroom” allows for families to learn the information at home, on their own time, and then to spend the classroom time asking questions and working on hands-on activities. I’m excited to give families the chance to learn on their own time BUT still get a chance to talk about concerns, do hands-on activities, and bring them together with other families to know that they all face similar concerns.  Parents who sign up will be sent lessons, a workbook, and get access to online content. During the online registration,  they will pick a Saturday afternoon session to attend for the classroom portion of the class.

A few caveats:  This is not for families who won’t commit to doing the work on their own. It’s super important to make sure all of the lessons are fully completed before coming to class so that that the class time isn’t spent going over material that was to be covered at home.  Also, as a “Ready For Birth” class, it does not cover baby care or breastfeeding, and families are STRONGLY encouraged to take these classes as well.

I’m looking forward to offering this class!  Have any questions? Comments?  Leave them below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Class Spotlight| Ready For Birth: Express Childbirth Class

One of the realizations I came to while in New Orleans is that parents really do need a one day option for prenatal education.  The Weekend Lamaze Series has been the compromise between time and content, but the reality is that it won’t work for everyone.  The (now defunct) Condensed Childbirth Prep was another compromise, but the feedback was that the Friday evening/ Saturday day combo just didn’t work for most families.  Thus, the Ready For Birth: Express Childbirth Class was born.

I’ve taught an express class when I taught in the hospitals.  There’s a weird thrill to get through all of the information in one day, and it requires more creativity to keep families from nodding off somewhere around 2pm.  While the pace does create challenges for retention of information, it’s still better than not attending classes at all.

What you WILL notice, though, is that the class will have at it’s heart a positive, interactive tone with the focus on helping each family calm fears and answer questions with the most up to date information available.

The Ready for Birth: Express Childbirth Class will be held on a Saturday, every other month, run from 9am-5pm with a one hour lunch break.  During class, we will cover:

  • Healthy pregnancy
  • The start and process of labor and birth
  • Informed choice
  • Labor interventions, including induction, pain medications, and cesareans
  • Hands on practice of comfort measures and relaxation techniques
  • Postpartum
  • Breastfeeding Basics

It’s the ideal class for families who don’t know where to start about all of the choices they’ll need to make about birth, and it’s also a great refresher class.  Because baby care and breastfeeding will not be covered in the Ready for Birth classes, it’s best to also take the Ready for Baby: Newborn Basics (coming to the schedule soon!) and Better Breastfeeding classes, too.  Finally, if you want even more practice for a med-free birth, then you can also attend the Labor Skills Intensive Workshop.

The very first class is coming up December 7th, so if you JUST realized you need to take a class– sign up now!!! There’s still time to get ready for your baby.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

WHO Code: What is it???

Today’s post is a video post.  I didn’t feel like writing. When we talk about the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, what does that mean?  Is it banning formula? (Answer? Absolutely not.)

Related links:

The Code in it’s entirety

A really great summary on The Code on Snugabell

The Standards of Practice for Certified Lactation Counselors (See “Q”)

Lamaze International’s stance on “The Code”

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Introducing: The Birth Communication Workshop

Birth Communication Workshop

Earlier last week, we sent out a survey asking families who had taken our classes for their opinions on various aspects of our classes.  We did allow room for them to tell us what other classes they wished we had.  Some of the suggestions are still being considered, but one suggestion we thought was so fantastic that we got it on the schedule right away.  So, we are pleased to announce that we will now be holding a Birth Communications Workshop on Saturday afternoons, held every other month on the same days as our Labor Skills Intensive Workshop.

The class description reads:

Filling out a birth plan online isn’t the the only thing you need to do to get the birth you want. So, although you can’t plan exactly how your birth will go, you can be prepared to communicate effectively and respectfully with your care provider. We will have time during this workshop to start on a well-written, clear, and effective birth plan. We will also discuss the variety of scenarios that might require extra communication, such as preterm birth, NICU stays, planned cesareans, and hospital transfers for home births. We will also talk about what to do if your care provider is not open to your specific birth preferences.  Class fee includes all materials and handouts and covers the attendance of the mother and one support person (which can be a husband, partner, family member, or friend). If you wish to bring a laptop with you to write your birth plan on, that is encouraged as well.

While it’s true that we do cover birth plans and Informed Consent/ Refusal in our Lamaze classes, we recognize that there are families who wish to have more help in getting prepared to communicate with the doctors or midwives, and get more understanding on how best to communicate with their various caregivers.  Our goal is to help families get the information they need to make decisions and to find their own voices, not to tell them what they should do (which is true of all of our classes).  And when very unexpected circumstances arise, they will be prepared to work with professionals and be involved in the decision-making process, which is a good life skill in general.

 

We’ve decided to go ahead and launch the first date on April 20th.  For the full list of dates and to register, visit the registration section of our website.  Sign up soon!

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Frequently asked questions about BabyLove

FAQ Picture

We’ve been open now for just over 18 months (HOORAY!), and we thought it might be helpful to post some answers to various questions that have come up recently.

  • Why don’t you sell products at BabyLove? – We get this a lot.  We have a couple of reasons.  Our main reason is that we feel that it would take away from our education if we also sold specific products.  So, for instance, when we teach our Cloth Diaper and Babywearing class, we know it might be really easy to then have the different carriers and diapers to sell right there, but we pride ourselves on having classes that discuss various products without making recommendations that we would profit from.  Also, parents are inundated with the message that parenting is about having “things”, and education just isn’t the same if it’s wrapped in a marketing pitch.  When you come to us, you’ll know FOR SURE that we get absolutely NO compensation from any company, and our integrity isn’t up for sale.
  • Why don’t you do an evening Mama Cafe?-  We did try evening Mama Cafe for awhile, but it didn’t really catch on.  We are always looking at new ways to serve our community, though, so stay tuned– we’re cooking up some new ideas!
  • Why don’t you have a Refresher Class anymore?- As a result of ridiculously low interest, we felt there were better ways to use that time on our class schedule.  We realized there was a need for something closer to a “crash course”– so we created the Condensed Childbirth Prep Class.  For families who really just want a Refresher, we still have it as a private class.  We’ve had a good number of 2nd and 3rd time mamas take our Lamaze classes, too, and we love having them there to share their experiences with new parents.
  • What happened to your VBAC class?- We still offer it, but as a private class.
  • The weather is really bad! How will I know if class is canceled?- We’ve already had an interesting winter, but we’ve only had to cancel class once and Mama Cafe once.  If a class is canceled, we will email or telephone everyone in the class to let them know.  If Mama Cafe is canceled, we will try to spread the message via social media.  Whenever in doubt, call or email us.  

Any other questions you want answered?  Let us know!

 

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

BabyLove’s Featured Family: Donncuan, Kelsey and Charles (Part Two)

On Monday, we kicked off our new blog feature where we highlight various BabyLove families with an interview with new mom Kelsey.  Today we get a dad’s perspective from Donncuan!

So, far, what has been your biggest joy in becoming a father?

Watching my son grow and develop. I never thought that seeing him hold his head up on his own, or hearing him make all those funny baby squeals would make me so proud. It is a joy just to see him smile every day.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve faced since your baby was born?

Learning what cry means what was quite a challenge. He would cry, and I would get so frustrated because I couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Of course, it was always the last thing I had done. If I had just fed him, he needed to be fed again. If I had just changed him, he needed to be changed again. Now I can tell what is bothering him, and he hardly ever cries any more. I suppose that means he finally has me trained J

How has your relationship with your partner changed since the birth of your baby?

I think we are more loving to each other now than before, in some ways. We both understand that it is a challenge to take care of our boy, so we both try extra hard to show our love and appreciation of the other. Whether it’s taking turns making dinner, or just holding him so the other can take a shower.

Did you feel that your childbirth classes prepared you for birth? How so?

In some ways, yes. Having a general overview of what was going to happen was very helpful, as well as having some tools and tricks to try to help my wife with labor. In the end, the best thing I could do to help my wife was just being there and focusing on her and the baby. However, I don’t think that if I had 10 years of training that I would be totally “prepared”. In my experience, our son’s birth was both scary and exciting, but I was never afraid for his, or my wife’s, health, and I credit that to our child birth classes and our midwife.

What is one thing you think all parents should know before the birth of their baby?

Don’t make any other plans for a few weeks! I thought that we would have our baby, and that I would go stir crazy sitting around the house watching him. It’s not like that at all. You’ll find yourself staring at him, feeding him, changing him, and when you look at the clock next, its 11:30 at night. Have a good support structure “just in case” you need a few hours break. Also, for the Mom’s, you are not a bad mother if your baby cries, or you get angry, or frustrated. You will spend days second guessing your decisions, from immunizations, to feeding times, to what kind of diapers to buy. Make a decision and go with it, the only thing that really matters is the love you have for your child. Babies don’t hold grudges. They aren’t going to hate you later in life because you accidentally nick them when you are trimming their toenails. Fill your baby’s heart with love and the little stuff will work itself out.

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.