WHO Code: What is it???

Today’s post is a video post.  I didn’t feel like writing. When we talk about the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes, what does that mean?  Is it banning formula? (Answer? Absolutely not.)

Related links:

The Code in it’s entirety

A really great summary on The Code on Snugabell

The Standards of Practice for Certified Lactation Counselors (See “Q”)

Lamaze International’s stance on “The Code”

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Introducing BabyLove Memberships

BabyLove Memberships

We know that more and more families are trusting us for all of their prenatal education, postpartum support, and ongoing education as their babies grow.  To help these families save money, we created memberships with 3 different levels to serve various goals and needs.

Membership Levels

Silver-$400: Unlimited BabyLove* classes for one year, up to two car seat checks

In one year you could take:

  • Evening Lamaze Series
  • Labor Skills Workshop
  • Birth Communication Workshop
  • Cloth Diapering/ Babywearing Combo Class
  • Early Potty Training
  • Baby Care: The First Year
  • 6 Dancing For Birth series

With the two car seat checks included, the package could easily be valued at $715.  That’s a HUGE Savings!

TOTAL:  $715, Potential savings of $315

Gold-$500: Unlimited BabyLove* classes for one year, up to two car seat checks, and four hours of in home lactation support

This package includes everything above, with the same huge cost savings, but included an additional 4 hours of in home lactation support, which has a $140 value.

TOTAL: $855, Potential Savings of $355

Platinum-$950: Unlimited BabyLove* classes for one year, up to two car seat checks, four hours of in home lactation support, and BabyLove doula services

Our prices for doula services range from $650-$750.  Not only will you get all of the awesome classes you want to take with us, but you will also get two experienced doulas for the birth of your child.

TOTAL: $1605, Potential savings of $655

Right now, in order to purchase these packages, just give us a call or send us an email and we will enroll you as a member.  You will have the ability to sign up for all of the classes you desire for a one year period via our registration system without needing to pay.  We are happy to answer any questions you might have!
*BabyLove classes do not include classes taught by outside educators, such as Calm Birth®, Small Talk Infant Sign, and specialty workshops

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

5 Items to Avoid on Your Baby Registry

what to avoid on baby registry

I’ve been getting lots and lots of questions lately on if I had good resources about registries,  and you know what?  I don’t.  The truth is, there are millions, if not billions, spent on advertising to new parents.  What do you actually need? Well, a car seat is a must (though you don’t need to buy an infant-only car seat with a handle. A convertible car seat works just fine too).  Your baby needs a safe place to sleep.  Clothes are good.  And diapers?  Well, you might want to check out how much diapers cost before you decide if you’ll go cloth versus disposables.  There are some things, though, that shouldn’t go on your registry, period.

1) A Boppy

Why you should avoid it: Originally marketed as a way to elevate baby while playing on the floor, it quickly seemed like it was a necessity for breastfeeding moms.  Truth be told, it leaves a huge gap by moms’ stomachs, it isn’t high enough to bring baby all the way up to breast, and it’s better for baby to be at a 45 degree angle (or more) when feeding.  Would you be able to drink while lying on your side? Nope. So don’t make your baby do that, either.

A better choice: Instead of a nursing pillow, add some lactation support to your wish list.  Have friends or family members buy you some prepaid time with a lactation pro in your home that you can call for help.  It’ll be way better than a pillow, I promise.

2) Crib Bumpers

Why you should avoid it: Well, for one, the AAP has warned against using them for many years now.  They are a SIDS risk.  The  city of Chicago made it illegal to sell them. Older babies can use them as a step and can fall out of their cribs. I’ve never quite understood what we thought they were going to do, anyway.  I mean, it’s not like your baby is going to get a running start and crack his or her head on the inside of the crib rails, will he?  Nope.

A better choice: Have people buy you some gift cards for restaurants that offer take out or that deliver.  That way when the pre-made meals run out, of if you just can’t handle having one more lasagna, you have a way to feed yourself.

3) Sleep positioners

Why you should avoid it: Originally touted as a way to prevent SIDS, the AAP expressly warned against using them in their updated guidelines from 2011.  Though, honestly, since that happened, I don’t see them much on store shelves anymore.  Still, some mom might tell you that you have to have one…but you don’t.

A better choice:  How about asking for gift cards for a grocery store that delivers?  Doesn’t that sound nice? Heck, I would like them even now.

4) Wipes Warmer

Why you should avoid it: Two words: fires and infections.  Wipe warmers have been known to overheat and start on fire.  And even if that extreme scenario doesn’t play out, the warm, wet environment is a hotbed of germs and can lead to infections.

A better choice: Let’s see….in the middle of the night, some Netflix streaming might be really nice.  Throw a gift subscription on your list.

5) A Baby Bjorn (the classic model)

Why you should avoid it: Any baby carrier that places all of baby’s weight on his or her crotch can case bruising, numbness, tingling, and even hip dysplasia.  Think about it…would you want to hang in that position for hours on end? Probably not.

A better choice: Let’s see: a wrap carrier, a ring sling, a mei tai, a soft structured carrier….anything that has your baby sitting in the carrier, not dangling.  Unsure about your options? Well, we have a class to help!

As I was pulling out our old, icky wipe warmer (Yep, I make mistakes, too.  We used that wipe warmer until my 10 day old son ended up in the ER with a UTI.), I found an old white noise machine.  And while I didn’t list it above, you DO want a noise machine.  Trust me.  When that first thunderstorm hits and your baby sleeps through it?  You’ll thank me.

Simplicity is key.  Also, you’ll be glad to eliminate the clutter in your home.

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Breastfeeding Resources Every Mom Needs

Breastfeeding resources

Have you tried looking for breastfeeding information online?  It’s hard, isn’t it?  It seems like there are so many opinions out there; how do you sort through all of them?  The answer?  You can’t.  Well, not really.  But if you know the right places to go to get accurate information, your life will be easier.  So, here are my go-to resources, and the reasons why I love them.

Going old-school: the best books

Don’t gasp.  There are some long-worshiped books missing. I don’t like them either because they are hard to use, only based on option, or flat out wrong. So here they are, ranked in order of my favorite to least favorite:

1) Breastfeeding Made SimpleI love this book because it follows my breastfeeding philosphy:  why make breastfeeding harder for moms?  The answers it gives are common sense, and better yet, help moms tap into their babies’ abilities.

2) A Nursing Mother’s CompanionAnother great book that’s easy to use.  At 2 AM, you don’t need to be hunting through a bunch of pages for ideas of what to try.  Here it’s all laid out in step by step instructions of what to try.

3) The Breastfeeding Answer Book- Dr. Jack Newman is another top researcher, so his book is pretty good in having accurate info.  It’s just not the easiest to use, IMHO.

Online resources

This is where moms get into trouble.  It’s a rabbit hole, I tell ya.  Don’t go on message boards, don’t hunt a million places…stick to these 3, ok? Your sanity thanks you in advance.

1) KellyMom.com- It’s my go-to online resource because it’s accurate, simple, and, now that most of the old broken links are fixed, a treasure trove of great info on all sorts of things, from the normal to the obscure.

2) BreastFeeding Inc- This is Dr. Newman’s online resource for his research.  You can get information in a variety of languages, too.

3) The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine- This is the best place to go to for accurate, evidence-based protocols, especially if you are finding your baby’s physician isn’t supporting breastfeeding.  It’s great for things like jaundice, too.

Apps for breastfeeding and medication

There’s so much bad information out there on what’s safe to take while breastfeeding, and what wasn’t safe to take while pregnant is usually safe to take while breastfeeding.  Here are two apps that you can download so you have the information at your fingertips, just in case.

1) The InfantRisk appThere’s also a phone line to call during the day, Monday through Friday, but the app is always available   Yes, it’s a little spendy, but it supports ongoing research and it’s very easy to use and very thorough.  And heads up, the info is not available on the website.

2) LactmedWhile Lactmed is free, it’s not as user-friendly as the InfantRisk app.  It can take a little bit of deciphering to determine if a medication is safe, but if you’re talking with a doctor or pharmacist, they’ll understand what they are reading.

Hopefully all of these things are useful.  Do you have anything that you love that I might have missed?  Let me know below!

Warmly,

Veronica

 

 

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Tongue Tie: A True Story

 

tongue tie blog post

 

Yep, this really happened to me.  I struggled and struggled with breastfeeding, but nobody could tell me why it was so hard and my daughter seemed “fussy”.  Finally, when she was 6 years old, I looked in her mouth and….she had a lip tie.  All of the people I went to for help could have noticed it…if they had the proper education on the importance of screening for tongue and lip ties.  Left untreated, tongue and lip ties can cause painful latching, difficulty latching, slow weight gain, sleep apnea, colic, speech issues, tooth decay, and misaligned teeth.  Find out more information here.

And if you are told that it’s normal, don’t buy it. IT’S NOT.

That’s my story!  The good news is we’re finally going to get it fixed.  I cringe to ask, but– do you have a story like this?

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Four reasons to rethink pacifiers

Pacifiers are such a tricky issue.  Many babies are given pacifiers while still in the hospital.  Tired, frustrated parents unprepared to have realistic expectations of newborn needs turn to pacifiers out of frustration.  Doctors, nurses, and midwives, perhaps lacking the time, energy, or skill to help breastfeeding moms, suggest pacifiers to mothers who actually need breastfeeding counseling.   And while most people downplay the role that pacifiers have in creating “nipple confusion”, the truth is that there are some other very important things to consider when making the decision to use a pacifier.

1) Babies are weaned from the breast earlier

There are multiple studies that have found a link between pacifier use and early weaning.  You can find one here, and here, and here.  Although many of the studies don’t point directly to a reason why this might be true, one theory is that mothers who use pacifiers are more likely to already be having breastfeeding issues, and turn to pacifiers out of frustration.  One large issue that I see with pacifiers is that they can allow parents to miss early hunger cues, or use pacifiers to “hold off” baby from feeding for a period of time.  When early hunger cues are missed, the only sign that baby is hungry can be crying, and it is very difficult to initiate breastfeeding with a crying baby. (Well, it’s hard for any of us to eat while crying, and babies are no different.) Also, when parents use pacifiers in an attempt to space out feedings, not only does baby not get enough breastmilk, but mom’s supply will be negatively affected by not providing baby enough of an opportunity to nurse.  Both of these scenarios can lead to frustrated parents, who then might wean before they originally intended to.

2) Pacifiers use is linked to more ear infections

This study found that children under the age of two were almost three times more likely to have ear infections. Another study found that when older babies are using pacifiers while in child care, they are much more likely to develop recurring ear infections.  All of these things are very significant.  Ear infections are no fun, we all know that.  And since the AAP guidelines for treating ear infections have been changed to avoiding antibiotic use, prevention is something to consider.

3) Pacifiers are likely to be contaminated with yeast 

Among other things. This study found that 44% of the pacifiers they examined had candida bacteria, and the children who had those pacifiers had oral yeast infections.  And since some of the most popular treatments for yeast infections have been called into question for their safety, preventing thrush is an important thing to consider when advising parents on pacifier use.

4) Pacifiers cause long-term dental issues

Many studies have found links between pacifiers and dental caries, as well as decay. Additionally, pacifiers cause the teeth to grow outward and the roof of the mouth to be raised, which makes it much more likely that the child will need to have orthodontic care later in life to correct teeth issues.

Now, let me be clear:  I’m not saying that pacifiers shouldn’t ever be used. However, I find parents can use them without thinking about the long-term possibilities of frequent pacifier use.  Additionally, as is true with things like nipple shields, they are no substitute for parent education and breastfeeding support done by someone with appropriate skills to help moms with breastfeeding.

The comments are open, but are moderated, as always.  I know this can be a heated topic, so please keep all comment evidence-based.

Warmly,

 

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Mama Cafe: More than just breastfeeding help

IMG_8990

When we were first in the planning stages of opening BabyLove, Brittany and I were adamant that we needed to have a free breastfeeding support group as part of what we did.  Thus, Mama Cafe was born.  Every week, without fail (well, except that one time we had a snow storm), we fire up the coffee pot, arrange the chairs, put out toys, and wait at our desks to see who will show up.  Truthfully, I’m always a little apprehensive. What if nobody shows up?  What if someone has a question that we can’t help with?  Did I make this coffee too strong?  But even on those weeks that I’m tired, or stressed out, or completely distracted, I am always so thankful to see the mothers and small beings that show up, sometimes every week for months in a row.

One thing I am starting to notice more and more is that moms are starting to form really great friendships with each other.  We have moms who took Lamaze classes together who then come back with their babies and continue the journey as mothers together.  Our experienced mothers are happy to give advice and share thoughts with the new moms. When a family has to miss, we really notice that they are gone.  And so while we know that the time and day might not work for everyone, we are glad that we are able to serve the moms that we can.

Another thing that I’m starting to notice more and more is that it seems like the brand new moms who come learn a lot about breastfeeding just by being around the moms who have gotten past those first few hurdles.  There’s a good reason for this:  we are actually hardwired to learn the process by watching others do it.  Ideally, too, these moms will watch what others are doing before the baby is born.  And while a really great breastfeeding class can lay a good foundation, peer support on a regular basis combined with professional assistance to troubleshoot bigger problems does make a really big difference.  Thankfully, with Mama Cafe, moms are getting both peer support and professional help.

But what I really wanted to write about is that Brittany and I are so thankful to see everyone who comes to Mama Cafe, and we are TRULY thankful that you trust us, you support us, you come to our other classes, you bring your friends, and that you appreciate what we do.  I’ll let you in on a little secret:  there are people who have thought, in the past, that we were crazy for not charging for Mama Cafe, or didn’t get why we would have a weekly group.  Well, oh well. This morning’s, busy, buzzing group of moms proved to me that we’re doing something right.  And if you are a mom who hasn’t been sure if you should join us Tuesday mornings, you absolutely should.  The trip out of the house will do you so much good!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

7 Things to Do While Nursing Your Baby

While Nursing

Here’s a not-so-well kept secret:  Brand new babies need to eat.  Some babies breastfeed quite frequently.  Some babies take awhile to nurse. That’s fine.  There’s no way to predict it and no way to really change it, so it’s best to go with the flow.

So, that leaves time mom is sitting on the couch, or in the rocker, or lying in bed with a baby who is eating, right?  To some moms, this is a bad thing– it’s “unproductive time”.  I challenge you to look at it differently: It’s productive time!  So here are some things you can actually do while you feed your baby:

1) Watch a TV show- It doesn’t matter if you have straight TV, cable, Roku, Netflix, DVDs, whatever, find a TV show and start watching.  With my first, it was Felicity.  With my second, it was Gilmore Girls.  A mom at Mama Cafe has been binge-watching The West Wing. Fine!  Great!  When else in your life will you ever have an excuse to do such a thing?  Answer?  Never.  So go for it!

2) Catch up on phone calls- I work from home in the afternoons.  The phones roll over from the office, so if I get a work-related call, it can be tricky; my kids are older, very talkative, and LOUD.  But back in the day when they were babies, if the phone rang and they got fussy– I’d just start nursing.  Or, if I was settling in for a feeding, I’d grab the phone, my to-do list, and start calling people. Win all around!

3) Read to older siblings- Siblings can feel left out when a new baby comes.  So, while the baby is busy being fed, find a book (or a game) that you can read to the sibling(s).  Everyone’s needs are met.  Done!

4) Baby grooming- OK, so you might think this is crazy (until you have kids are you find yourself doing just this), but while babies are nursing is a GREAT time to pick out eye crusties, ear wax, and even–wait for it- trim fingernails by tearing them with your teeth. Yep.  I said it.

5) Social media- Tweeting and Facebook extensively while breastfeeding is totally acceptable.

6) Be at Mama Cafe- Even if you don’t have a question, being with other moms is very important as your life changes.  If you do have questions, we’re happy to help, and our other moms certainly have wisdom to share.  And if you have to pee, we’re happy to hold your baby so you can go to the bathroom all by yourself.  And trust us, as moms,  it’s a rare moment to get to go without someone else bugging you. So Mama Cafe.  Tuesdays.  Be there.

7) Walk around- Once you have breastfeeding figured out and your baby is a little older, you can find carriers that work well with breastfeeding.  I’ll never forget the time my sister was visiting with my small nephew and we were out at the mall and he got hungry.  She just adjusted her Ergo, opened up her tank top, and zipped her light sweater around herself and the baby and we just kept walking.  Nobody could see anything, her baby was happy, and she could keep going and safely feed her baby.

If I missed any good ideas, leave it in the comments below!

-Veronica

 

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

5 Breastfeeding Issues Your Care Provider Might Miss

Class at BabyLoveI’m always saddened and amazed how many moms didn’t met their breastfeeding goals because the people they trusted to help them didn’t have the knowledge or skills to actually help solve breastfeeding problems.  Breastfeeding is an interesting thing; there are factors for both mom and baby that can make breastfeeding a challenge, and some of the things that come up are not known about by the doctors, nurses, midwives, doulas, and even lactation consultants that mothers rely on in the early days of breastfeeding.  The impulse is usually to treat the symptoms, but not the underlying cause.

If you think that you or your baby might be dealing with one of these issues, please find a provider who is familiar with the problem and discuss it with him or her.  I’m writing this for educational purposes only, and it is not meant to replace medical advice.

1) Tongue tie and lip tie

OK. This is one thing that we know happens, but there’s still way too many car providers TOTALLY in the dark about the condition.  With tongue time, the latch can look perfect, but the frenulum (the piece of skin under baby’s tongue) is too tight or too ling and does not allow baby to stick out his or her tongue all the way, making breastfeeding difficult for baby and painful for mom. Left untreated, a tongue tie can lead to many issues in adults, including speech impediments, migraines, and, this doctor thinks there might be a link to sleep apnea.  If I can get on my soapbox for a second, assessment for tongue and lip tie needs to be a part of the normal newborn assessment RIGHT AFTER BIRTH; if there’s a problem, it can be corrected swiftly and everyone will be happy.  You can find more information and resources here, but by FAR the best thing that I’ve found for parents (and care providers who aren’t in the know) is this fun little e-book. It has pictures and talks about why and how to have tongue and lip ties addressed.

2) Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER)

When we talk to moms about breastfeeding, we talk about the Oxytocin and the Prolactin that is produced and the feeling of love and bonding that happen as a result of  these hormones.  For some moms, though, the act of breastfeeding can lead to feeling of sadness, anxiety, or other negative emotions during the milk ejection (aka “letdown”) part of the breastfeeding process. So while the breastfeeding is supposed to be a positive experience, moms with D-MER have a negative experience every time they feed their babies.  Fortunately, there are treatments for D-MER.  One of my favorite resources for information on D-MER and treatments is D-MER.org.  They have treatments, resources, and even links to Facebook groups for mothers who are looking for information and support.

3) Thyroid Problems

Thyroid and other endocrine issues can cause a whole list of issues, but they also can lead to low supply.  My copy of The Breastfeeding Answer Book states that about 17% of mothers have a thyroid issue that affects supply (p.567) They can even arise after birth in moms who don’t have a history of thyroid issues.  Whenever a mom is facing a true, persistent low supply issue, it can be a good idea for her to visit an endocrinologist for tests of all her hormone levels. With proper treatment and on going monitoring, mothers often experience a rapid improvement in milk supply. For more information, check out the information listed on Kelly Mom.

4)Over supply/ Overactive Letdown

While low supply is a well-known issue, over supply can also create issues for a motherbaby pair.  It can result in baby refusing to feed, excessive spitting up, or pain for mom with letdown.  Some mothers just naturally have a large supply or forceful letdowns, other can fall into the issue by taking galactogogues (herbs and medications meant to increase supply) when no real need exists or by pumping unnecessarily.  In my opinion, we are no so over-fixated on low supply (for better or worse) that mothers are told to try to up supply unnecessarily, leading to too much milk for some moms. And for other moms, they start pumping too much, and up supply so much that it can lead to too much milk (basically, their body almost thinks that there are two babies to feed– the real baby and the pump baby.)  To solve this issue, we usually have mom stop taking the galactogogues right away, or start to cut back on pumping to see if supply moderates and baby is doing better. The other half of the solution is to help baby feed in a more upright position and to place baby is such a way that he or she can better control the force of the flow.  Usually laid-back breastfeeding can make it easier for both mom and baby.

5) Vasospasm

Sometimes nipples can turn white as a result of an incorrect latch.  Sometimes, though, the nipple can turn white as a result of vasospasm.  This can lead to pain, tingling, and blue or bring red nipples as the blood flow returns to the nipple.  This doesn’t make breastfeeding impossible, but it is a condition that can be managed by the application of dry heat, keeping the nipple warm right after baby unlatches, and by reducing the amount of caffeine and alcohol mom ingests.  More information on vasospasm and Raunaud’s Phenomenom can be found on this great Kelly Mom article.

Hopefully all of these things are helpful.  Did you have one of these breastfeeding issues go undiagnosed for a long time?  How did it affect your breastfeeding relationship? Sound off below!

Let me know if you have questions!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.