What’s been going on?

Hello all,

Just as I logged in to write this blog post, I noticed I hadn’t written anything for MONTHS. Months. The school year is winding down, time has flown by, and you’re probably wondering…..what happened?

I’ve been a doula and childbirth educator for the last 10 years. A decade. Starting last fall, I was starting to tell I was getting burned out. By January, I was REALLY burned out. I needed a change.

So, what have I been doing, you ask?

Well, In February I started as an office manager for an organization in the Twin Cities. I have learned SO MUCH i the last years of BabyLove’s existence that it turns out I’m pretty good at helping organizations run and helping them move into 2017 with day to day operations. (Is this when I mention I do business consulting? Ahem.)

I’ve phased out of teaching classes at BabyLove. Lora Murtha, who has been teaching here for the better part of 18 months (and really, pretty much a founding BabyLove mama before that) is teaching classes. She’s still passionate. she’s super smart, and families are in excellent hands with her. After all, she was my apprentice. ;) But I am around. I still have doula nights, office stuff to do. I’m still here,

The other HUGE change here is that BabyLove has moved back to suite 200. Because of the changes of my roles here, we’ve consolidated into one space with The BabyLove Alliance. It just made more sense. I’d also like to thank the families who have put up with the craziness as we re-settle in upstairs. But, this does mean that class sizes are limited to 5 families.

We have classes up through the summer, and Fall offerings will be coming. We’ve decided to keep costs the same. But, the main point of this is to tell you that yes, BabyLove is still open. I’m just not here every day. Yes we moved, yes the space is different, but it feels really great to be back up here and it WILL be great once things get all put into place.

And I want to say thank you to everyone who has come here for the last 5.5 years. Thank you for helping me grow and helping me turn the page to the next chapter. I am forever grateful for this journey– all of it. And I’m not going away.

With love,

Veronica, Owner of BabyLove

 

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Announcing Twin Cities Hospital Birth Costs at a Glance!

After last year’s epic process of compiling costs for births and newborn care, I was trying to figure out a more accessible way for parents to get the 2015 data. So, I created a more streamlined guide-at-a-glance.

This guide has a few features: health system affiliation is listed, allowing you to see how they differ in cost from company to company. It’s just two pages, making it easy to flip back and forth. I had fun compiling the information, and I hope you find it useful!

Warmly,

Veronica

Get your copy of Twin Cities Hospital Birth Costs at a Glance

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

What confident births look like

The weekend, during the Ready for Birth: Express class, I took a couple of minutes to show a birth video that I don’t always show; it was a larger class, and it was wonderful to have so many different families. Some were giving birth in birth centers, others in hospitals, some with OBs, others with midwives. There are a billion birth videos out there, but I love this first one because it’s a wonderfully accurate depiction of birth: the mom has intense contraction waves, but is able to still laugh a little during the breaks in between. It shows her moving around and changing positions. And more importantly, it shows how gorgeous birth can be when the person giving birth is surrounded by caring providers in a calm, patient environment. On Saturday, after this video, there weren’t many dry eyes.

The birth of Cody Taylor | Waterbirth at Mountain Midwifery Birth Center in Denver, CO from crownedbirthphotography on Vimeo.

Why do I want to show you these? Because birth is usually talked about in a way that’s scary. Because birth isn’t shown realistically on TV or in the movies. Because most people never hear about the amazing empowering, positive births– only the traumatic ones.

Here’s a birth in a hospital. It is another water birth, and I’m not terribly thrilled with how long it took to get baby to the surface, but it’s cool.

Milo’s Water Birth from David Mullis on Vimeo.

Here’s a hospital breech birth–keep in mind, these care providers are taught how to deliver vaginal breech births. It is something that is possible, but ONLY when the care providers know how to handle it. There are still quite a few places where vaginal breech birth is a skill still emphasized during education and training. Unfortunately, it’s not taught in the US on anything approaching a regular basis.

Nascimento Mariana, parto natural hospitalar pélvico – 04/jul/2013 – Natural breech hospital birth from Além D’Olhar fotografia on Vimeo.

A preterm birth of a wee double rainbow baby; again, the care provider is calm, patient, and caring. Births of rainbow babies are emotionally challenging. When a family gets pregnant after a previous stillbirth or miscarriage, there’s the very reasonable fear that another loss can happen. BUT, and this is important– in these cases, it’s even more critical to have a calm, caring, supportive birth environment rather than a fearful, negative birth environment.

Double Rainbow Baby, the Birth Story of Emilia from Jennifer Mason on Vimeo.

A hospital birth in—well, not the US. I love everything about this video. Again– you see calm, patience, and encouragement.

Thomas | Parto natural hospitalar from Ana Kacurin on Vimeo.

So here’s the deal: Everyone deserves this kind of environment during birth. Full stop. It’s not about medicated, unmedicated, natural, vaginal–it’s about understanding that birth is a normal biological process. It’s about a mother who is confident in her body’s abilities. It’s about having care providers and support people present who hold the space. Birth can be positive. It’s a lot of work, it’s never easy, but it doesn’t have to suck. A triumphant experience is possible.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

From the Archives: Writing a Birth Plan

how-to-write-a-birth-plan

The subject of using online birth plans came up last night, so I wanted to distill my advice here on the blog. Turns out, I wrote about it 4.5 years ago. Ha! Ah well, it’s still good advice.

-Veronica

Originally published February 7th, 2012:

First of, let me say this:  I know you can’t plan your birth.  You can’t decide it’ll last only 20 minutes, or that you’ll only push twice.  Do you know this?  I hope you know this.  Rather, a birth plan is a tool that should be used by a mother to sort out her options and to communicate those preferences to her care provider.  While she can not plan what will happen, she can give a good amount of thought to how she will handle what happens.  Also?  I believe very, very much that it’s something that should be done no matter the place of birth.  Even moms planning home births need to think about what they want or don’t want.  So, after giving much thought over the last couple of days as to what makes a birth plan good, and what can make it very, very bad, I give you the following advice:

DON’T: Go to a website that “writes” a birth plan for you by having you check off a couple of boxes that sounds good.  Why?  Well, it comes across that you put very little thought into writing your birth plan.  Also, you can end up “choosing” things that are not even an issue at your desired birth place (like saying you don’t want to be told what to wear during labor at a home birth).  However, if you feel completely stuck, you can check out one of those websites for some ideas, just make sure you rewrite things in your own words.

DO: start with an introductory couple of sentences. Think along the lines of: This is my second birth.  My first birth was very long, and very difficult, with many things that felt like I was not listened to.  I am hoping for a much calmer, more supported birth. Or whatever fits your specific situation.  Make it short, to the point, and applicable to this birth. It will help the people who are part of your birth team know very quickly what you are looking for, which means that (hopefully) they will be supportive of where you are physically and emotionally, not where they think you should be.

DON’T introduce anyone and everyone in your life in the birth plan.  A birth plan is not an autobiography.  Please don’t use it  to introduce the nursing staff to your cats, or your turtles, or your childhood home that you haven’t been to in 25 years.  And for goodness sakes– no pictures of these things!

DO keep the information relevant.  If there is something about your medical history that is relevant to this specific labor and birth, include it.  Yes, it’s in your chart…somewhere.  But save everyone a headache and confusion and include that important information right at the top of your birth plan. Have you already met with an anesthesiologist and found out that you are not, for a specific reason, a candidate for an epidural?  Include that!  Is the father of the baby not participating in the birth because of religious or cultural reasons?  Include that! Trust me, it will save so much time and frustration of everyone is, almost literally, on the same page.

DON’T make your birth plan more than a page long, two at the most.  Very important information gets lost in long birth plans, and it can seem like not much actual thought went into writing the plan.

DO make sure only time-specific information is in the plan.  Don’t bring a plan to the hospital that talks about laboring at home (or how long you’ll wait before calling your midwife for a home birth). You do need to think about things like that, but it can end up burying the more relevant information.

DO write out a really long plan, if you feel you need to.  You can include things like how long you want to labor until calling your doula, or at what point you want to o to the hospital, or fill up your birth tub at home–whatever.  But then sit down with someone and go through that list with a very critical eye, and think, “What will people need to know at the time?” Then start to cut things out, leaving a shorter version.

DON’T list things that are not done at your chosen place for giving birth. If they don’t do routine IVs, don’t say, “I do not want a routine IV.” On the flip side, be reasonable.  Don’t list things that just CAN NOT happen, like, “If I have an epidural, I do not want an IV.”

DO take good, comprehensive childbirth classes so you can understand all of your options and help you understand how to avoid those things you do not want.  So, for instance, if you don’t understand why IVs might be used, you might need a class.  If you were never told the many different ways an induction might be done, you need a better class.  This might ruffle a feather or two, but knowing about something doesn’t mean it’ll happen.  Ignorance IS NOT bliss.  Hopefully there are things you’ll never need to go through, but knowing about them, just in case, is always a good idea.

And finally:

DON’T assume that writing something down means that it will be so.  Make sure that your care provider (and, since most people see a group practice, ALL the possible providers) will take the time to listen and respect your voice.  There is nothing sadder to me than telling families prenatally to address specific things with a care provider, only to watch those parents find out that  Midwife X won’t allow it, or Doctor Y doesn’t believe in it while mom is in labor.  Yes, you are the patient, but birth time should not be battle time, and if there are options, find the very best care provider to fit what you want.  And yes, it is worth it.

Quickly, in my opinion, what should a birth plan touch on?

  • support people
  • environment
  • comfort measures
  • labor positions/ tools
  • medication preferences
  • pushing and birth positions
  • newborn procedures (right after birth and the few days after birth)
  • post-birth maternal procedures

I’m sure I missed a thing or two (or three).  What do you think?  What tips would you add?  What else do you think is a MUST INCLUDE?  Add it in the comments below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Twin Cities Cesarean Rate Trends, 2005-2015

OK, so I’ve been collecting historical data on Cesarean rates in the Twin Cities metro hospitals from as far as I could go back, which was 2005. I’ve finally had enough time to pull it all together. There are some pieces of info missing, but here’s a decade’s worth of Cesarean rates:

twin-cities-cesarean-rate-trends

Back in March, I made some predictions for 2015 overall Cesarean rates. I had written:

Speaking of 2015 Cesarean rates, that info isn’t available, but I’m going to throw caution to the wind and make a few guesses. I think we’ll see an increase in rates at Woodwinds, a slight increase at Methodist and a larger increase at Maple Grove (largely as a result of the high primary rates from OBGYN West and Western OBGYN), increases at Ridges, Southdale, and Regions. I’m going to predict a drop in the overall censarean [sic] rate at Abbott Northwestern, St. Joe’s, and North Memorial. I don’t think there will be many changes at St. Francis, St. John’s, or United. As far as the Unity and Mercy…who knows. Now, we’ll have to see if I’m right.

 

So, how did I do?

I was right about Woodwinds, Methodist, Maple Grove, Regions, Abbott, and North Memorial. St. Francis saw a significant increase. St. John’s held pretty steady, and United had a teeny drop, but still a decrease in their Cesarean Rate. St. Joe’s saw the trend continue, with an increase in their rates that began in earnest in 2010. Woodwinds trended higher again in 2015 after a decrease from 2012 to 2014. Regions, Waconia, and St. Francis had the most significant increases, While Stillwater and Mercy had the largest decreases. And THANK HEAVENS that Abbott has made significant strides in reducing their overall cesarean rate after 2010.

See my previous post if you have questions about why this stuff matters. Otherwise, these trends are very interesting to look at! Now to wait again until data comes out in March again….if it comes out. If you’re looking at this data and mad that more isn’t out there, well, start pulling together the resources to get laws like the ones in New York passed. Without a state grassroots effort, we get what we get and we don’t throw a fit, unfortunately.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Free Car Seats at BabyLove

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Even before I opened BabyLove, I worked at a local hospital, and one of the things I would do is teach many of the classes we held for people who were on UCare or MHP. They both had car seat programs where members on PMAPs through the State of MN could get car seats.

Fast forward to now.

I haven’t ever advertised it, but I am a contracted provider for people on HealthPartners PMAPs and MN Care to provide both car seat education and a free car seat in my office by appointment.

What, free car seat? Yep!

Women on a HealthPartners PMAP or MN Care plan who are at least 6 months pregnant and children on HealthPartners PMAP or MN Care plan from ages 0 to 8 are eligible to get one car seat during their lifetime as a member benefit. To get a car seat, either the pregnant person or the parent of an eligible child (I’ve never had a child call for himself, but I guess it could happen) calls me to schedule an appointment. The easiest availability is during the day, but I do have some limited evening appointments available. An appointment takes about 45 minutes. During the appointment, they are taught how to correctly install and use their car seat, both by video and hands-on demonstration. Unfortunately, I do not actually install the seat. When we’re done, they leave with the car seat or seats in hand.

Easy peasy!

So tell your friends, family, strangers…..if they have a HealthPartners PMAP or MN Care plan and fall into one of the two groups above….we can get them a seat! Just call me, Veronica, at 651-200-3343 to schedule an appointment.

That’s all for today, folks!

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Medical Bill Basics: Explained

medical bill explained

Ever since Vox.com put out a video on how hard it is to determine the cost of birth, I’ve found myself wanting to put my head on my desk numerous times per day. If you haven’t seen it yet, check it out:

Some people have pointed out that there are tools to help figure out how much a birth will cost, though it’s usually on a per state basis. Late last year, you may remember that I did a couple of extensive blog posts where I took a few hours to pull together the information for Twin Cities costs for births depending on the mode of delivery and the health of the baby.

The problem with that, though? It doesn’t even to start to take into account one tricky little layer: Each health insurer has different contractual allowances that ultimately determines how much you pay.

So, let me explain it this way:

  • Louise has a procedure done. The provider bills her insurance $175 for it.
  • Louise’s insurance has pre-set a rate of $90.47 for the maximum allowable fee arrangement for that specific procedure.

A few ways this could play out:

  1. Louise has yet to meet her deductible, so she has to pay $90.47 out of pocket to the provider for it.
  2. Louise HAS met her deductible, but she has to pay a co-pay amount. In this example, let’s say she has a $40 co-pay. She would pay the $40 to the provider, and the insurer would reimburse the provider $50.47.
  3. Louise’s insurance has a 30/70 split on all billed costs. Louise then pays $27.14 to the provider for the procedure, and the insurer would reimburse the provider for $63.33.

And this can go on and on and on in various permutations depending on all of the possible plan set ups. A different insurer could set that maximum allowable fee at a paltry $30.17. (Good for their shareholders, totally awful for the providers.) Can you see how it would start to be totally impossible to actually get an idea of what birth would cost?

Keep in mind, too, that everything done during birth can be turned into a billed procedure. There’s no way to anticipate what that might look like, because some hospitals will even bill you a couple buck PER TYLENOL.

This situation is  really, really, complex and has a lot of nuance I don’t think anyone has tried to explain too hard. I’ve even tried my best to explain what the process of “taking insurance” looks like from the provider side, and that doesn’t even begin to scratch the surface of how awful and infuriating it is.

All this is to say that, yes, it is really complex. I have my own opinions of how US Health Care could be made less expensive and safer, but I also know it’s not as easy to unravel as anyone who talks about it thinks it should be.

 

Have I missed anything? Are you a health care smarty with something to add?

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Twin Cities Hospital Baby Costs

Twin Cities Baby Costs

In case you missed it, last week I published a blog post that compiled the costs listed on the Minnesota Hospital Price Check website. Like I said then, there are some limitations on the information; those numbers don’t reflect variations in deductibles, co-pays, and co-insurance. Also, I used the “Average Cost”, which takes into account that various hospitals and various conditions have longer or shorter average lengths of stays. However, it’s a number that makes for some useful comparisons.

One thing I wanted to mention: If you’ve been following this blog over the last 4 years, you’ll know that I think this data is exceptionally important to help parents pull together the information that they need to make decisions about safe births. Giving birth is the one “medical” life event that usually allows people enough time to plan and ask questions in preparation for finding good care. Where you go and who your care provider is is THE biggest factor in determining outcome. Not mom’s health. Not baby’s health. And certainly, hospitals are businesses (although non-profits), so following the money is really important.

I love to have in-depth discussions about these things in my childbirth classes, and I love to help families who are unsure about their options or the choices they made ask the questions they need to ask to find the best care for their family. It’s a huge part of Lamaze education, and it’s something I think every parent can benefit from.

Back to today’s chart. Most births involve healthy newborns, but there are times when complications arise for baby. For this reason, I included 6 total diagnosis codes in the chart. Some hospitals, due to lack of appropriate facilities to care for sicker babies, won’t have data listed; they transfer those babies to hospitals with NICUs. Also, in the “Prematurity with Major Problems” and the “Extreme immaturity or respiratory distress syndrome, neonate” categories, you’ll notice some hospitals have very low costs listed compared to other hospitals. Those “cheaper” hospitals had very few babies in 2014 with those diagnosis codes, usually less than 10. Those are outliers that can mostly be ignored. And certainly, this doesn’t capture all the intricacies, so I urge anyone who really wants to know more to look at the data on his or her own, or leave comments below.

Baby Hospital Costs

If you think this is valuable, please check out everything I offer at BabyLove and come see me!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Twin Cities Hospital Birth Costs

MN Hospital Birth Costs

(Update 11/13/15 12:39PM) Please note that these numbers do NOT include charges for baby.

A long time ago, during the Pawlenty Administration, the Minnesota Hospital Administration was required to provide information about hospital costs online to allow consumers to compare prices. Lucky for us, this includes obstetric charges. There are some limitations to this information– it doesn’t give us the information on what a specific individual’s costs will be when you take into account deductibles, plan allowances, and co-pays. I also decided to use the 2014 Average Total Cost rather than the Average Daily Cost or the Median Cost in this table. There’s a million ways to slice this information, but I’m a busy mom and this is what I did.

I sorted the information by health system rather than just alphabetical. There are some big surprises– since the Park Nicollet/ HealthPartners merger, Methodist Hospital and Regions are owned by the same company, but the differences in costs are HUGE. You can find more of the information on the Minnesota Hospital Price Check website, but they only allow you to compare 3 hospitals for one kind of charge at a a time. So yeah, the work to get this was tedious. It was also really tricky to get the data from the spreadsheet to this blog.

Minneapolis Hospital ChargesI hope you find this interesting and helpful. Have questions or observations? Post them below!

Warmly,

Veronica

 

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Where to go to prevent tearing

vaginal tears

Awhile back, I did a quick post on a few of the rates of tears at different hospitals in the Twin Cities area. The info has been slightly updated, and I decided to pull the information for all of the area hospitals.

A few notes: The website that lists this information doesn’t specify what degree of perineal tears they are talking about. Tears are rated first degree, second degree, third degree, and fourth degree. First and second degree tears can be pretty common. Most epidemiological discussions about tears focus only on 3rd degree tears and second degree tears. I’m hoping to get some clarification on what the heck they are talking about when they say “tears”, and I’ll update this post as I can.

Perineum Tears: Rates for Vaginal Deliveries without Instruments; for some reason, St. Joseph’s is missing.

Lowest rates to highest:

  1. Shakopee- 1%
  2. Ridgeview- 1%
  3. St. John’s- 1%
  4. HCMC- 2%
  5. Lakeview-2%
  6. Unity- 2%
  7. Regions- 2%
  8. North Memorial- 2%
  9. Mercy Hospital- 2%
  10. University of Minnesota- 3%
  11. United- 3%
  12. Regina- 3%
  13. Ridges- 3%
  14. Methodist- 3%
  15. Northfield- 4%
  16. Woodwinds- 4%
  17. Southdale- 4%
  18. Maple Grove- 4%
  19. The MotherBaby Center/ Abbott Northwestern- 5%

Perineum Tears: Rates for Vaginal Deliveries with Instruments

Lowest rates to highest:

  1. Regina- 0%
  2. University of Minnesota- 5%
  3. Hennepin County Medical Center- 10%
  4. St. John’s- 10%
  5. Woodwinds- 10%
  6. Regions- 12%
  7. Unity- 12%
  8. St. Joseph’s- 13%
  9. Southdale- 13%
  10. Northfield- 13%
  11. United- 14%
  12. Shakopee-15%
  13. Ridges- 16%
  14. North Memorial Medical Center- 16%
  15. Mercy- 19%
  16. Methodist- 24%
  17. Ridgeview- 27%
  18. Maple Grove- 20%
  19. The MotherBaby Center/ Abbott Northwestern- 24%

Beyond choosing your care provider and place where you give birth with a lot of thought and care, make sure you know the different ways you can make pushing and birth as safe as possible. Check out our Confident Birth and Beyond (Lamaze) classes, too, to learn how to have a safe and healthy birth.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.