Real Mom Confessions: May 27th

Real Mom Confessions

Today has been a horrible day. One of those days that make me want to pack up my favorite items (namely my antique amber necklace and my iPad) and run away from home and follow Dessa around Germany. I know when I write on this blog post it’s often about things that I feel very passionate about, but this week I’m largely too tired to stay passionate.

Anyway.

So, in the spirit of normalizing the ups and downs of being a mom, here’s my week:

1) We spent the holiday weekend giving the kids their own rooms for the first time since my son was born. There was more yelling than I’d like to admit, each day was very long and tiring for all of us, the kids ended watching more movies than usual, but the house is cleaner than it has been in ages and I love how it all turned out.

2) I’m also happy to say that my son is now able to fall asleep on his own. He wasn’t before; he was too scared in his old room. OK, so our rescue dog Harley is in there while my on falls asleep, but it’s progress, right? And yes, we’ve spent almost 7 years helping my worried son go to sleep.

3) Tonight was the last official troop meeting for my daughter’s girl scout troop; I’m troop leader, and I have to admit that I spent pretty much the entire year not actually knowing what I was doing. Case in point? Tonight we were teaching the girls how to start a fire and guess what I forgot? Matches. I have to say, though….I think the girls had a fun year. That’s what counts, right?

4) I forgot we ran out of eggs so when I went to make pancakes for dinner tonight, I had to figure out a substitution. We’re out of applesauce, too, so that was out. After consulting the interwebs, I ended up subbing in….Miracle Whip. Nobody noticed, and it wasn’t bad.

So with that, I’ll see where next week finds me; hopefully in a better place than today.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Business Basics Part One: Smart Starts

how to start birth business

I’ve written before about the realities of owning a business that not everyone knows about. I also spend a lot of time reading articles on running a business, talking with others about running a business, and loads and loads of time actually running the business. One of the biggest mistakes people make when starting something new from scratch is that they only hear a dead baseball player’s voice in their heads telling them, “If you build it, they will come.”

Gosh I hope people get that reference. Anyway.

You can be talented, passionate, skilled, etc….but there are things you need to do to get the little tiny sparks of inspiration and courage that got you excited to start your business to catch fire. I’m going to try to write a number of posts to help explain a little bit of what’s in my head and what I’ve learned (usually the hard way) to hopefully help others. Consider it a dose of reality wrapped in a candy coating of love. First up? Smart beginnings.

  • Have a office– either a real physical space or a space at home that’s only for work. If you went from being employed by another business to being self-employed, you may not have the discipline to stay accountable to yourself. Going to an office helps your brain switch from “hanging out” mode to working mode so you can actually focus on the tasks at hand. Having an actual office helps you seem more legitimate to others, too. Just don’t make the mistake of getting a luxury space before you have the income to justify it.
  • Don’t spend your precious time doing easy stuff like trying to build Facebook. The reality? Social media isn’t the amazing free marketing tool that it was 5 years ago. Sure, having a presence there builds engagement, but you have more important things to do, and it’s too easy to get sucked in to reading through your own Facebook or Twitter feed.
  • Spend time figuring out not just what you’re trying to sell, be it a service or a product, but what you’re going to tell people when they ask why they need whatever you’re trying to do or sell. Also helpful? Figure out how to set yourself apart, or, if you want a tongue-in-cheek, singable way to put it: You’ve gotta get a gimmick if you want to get ahead. (The video is mostly safe for work until the 3:00 mark.) I’ve never seen a single episode of Mad Men, but I have to imagine that’s Marketing 101.
  • Don’t know what to do? Learn! Get yourself a good mentor. Check in with some of the amazing resources out there from places like Entrepreneur or Inc. magazine. When I’m feeling a tiny bit stuck, those places can be awesome sources of insight and inspiration.  (Which reminds me: I need to schedule time with my mentor.)
  • Get yourself a good banker. I’ve been lucky to have come across a really good one. The smaller banks who focus on small (like, small, not just “capital less than $5 million” small) businesses can again help you learn how to be smart with money and give you access to capital tools to help you get of the ground. Meet with your banker quarterly.

My main point? If you’re going to be successful, you have to do the work. You. Don’t expect someone else to come along and do all of the heavy lifting for you. Be disciplined, be creative, and be deliberate. And find someone to be accountable to, be it a mentor, another business pal that you can trust, or a banker. I hope this was helpful. I’ll write more later this week, but if there are things you’d like me to touch on, comment below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Real Mom Confessions: May 20th, 2015

Real Mom Confessions

One of the few bloggers I keep up with anymore, Girl With Blog, started this thing awhile ago where she blogs about the truths of parenting that we all go through one time or another but don’t often share. I also read somewhere recently about there not being enough blogs who talk about parenting school-aged kids. So while I spend almost all of my time on this blog talking about pregnancy, birth, and babies, here’s what’s going on in my life:

1. My two kids are done with school in 2 weeks and I’ve been in complete denial about making firm plans on what to do with them this summer. I can’t bring them in every day to the office any more, and there isn’t a budget for anything more than the patchwork solution we’ve been trying to come up with. I hate summers.

2. I had two babies spit up on me at Mama Cafe yesterday, and you know what? I didn’t mind. I didn’t even change my shirt until bedtime. Old habits and such.

3. It took me almost 3 weeks after buying plants for my garden to get them in the ground. The seed packets that were with the seeds had been out in the sun and the rain that whole time….and weren’t exactly seeds by the time I planted them, too.

4. Right now I just want my kids to come inside so I can lie down on the couch and take a 15  20 minute nap.

That’s what I have this week! I’m hoping to keep it real and share with you my reality next week!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Meet our new doulas!

As you may remember, I announced the launch of Metro Doula Agency, LLC just over a year ago. Since then, my doula partner Liz and I have been taking clients as a team, and it’s been wonderful. We know our team model improves the quality of support that families receive and it makes life easier on us and our families.

The word “agency” implies there will be other doulas…and I’m excited to announce that we’ve brought on two wonderful women. They will be working as a team as well. I’ve had a chance to spend time with them and I could not be more thrilled with their gentle hearts and bright spirits. Below you’ll find pictures and introductions from Liz R. and Katelyn. They are both trained and have experience, but are working on their certifications.

We know that the agency model is something new to the area, but I’m confident families and providers will come to know that our doulas are the most professional doulas around, that they are highly knowledgeable, and that families will never be without support for their birth, no matter what. Metro Doula Agency stands behind our promise to support families, even through long labors, epidurals, or cesarean births.

With the addition of these two fine ladies, we are able to offer doula services on a sliding fee. So if you’ve been wanting to hire a doula, but have been trying to scrape together pennies to pay for one, we may be a wonderful solution to give you continuous labor and birth support. Contact us at info@metrodoulaagency.com metrodoulaagency@gmail.com and we’ll get you the excellent doula care you deserve.

Warmly,

Veronica

Minneapolis birth doula

Hi!
My name is Liz Ripka. I am 30 years old and have been a birth doula for the past year. I have always been fascinated with pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period.  After many of my friends, and family told me how wonderful I would be as a birth doula I thought I would look into it. A few weeks later I found a workshop and began my training. I have never felt so passionate about my job! I love being able to help and support women and their partners.  I focus on offering a nurturing presence, educating, supporting a woman’s choice, and making the birth of their child as special as possible to each family. I believe that laughter and love are important in the birth process. In addition to working with BabyLove as a birth doula, I am a nanny for two adorable little boys. I love serving each and every family and I feel so honored to be welcomed into their life story. I look forward to this journey!

St. Paul Birth Doula

Hello!

My name is Katelyn Hinrichs. I was born and raised in Minnesota and currently reside in the suburbs of Minneapolis with my family of four. My interest for birth came about when I gave life to my firstborn. I found myself reading anything I could get my hands on, and it was then that I realized this was my calling and there was no looking back! When I’m not spending time with my family, I love to grab some coffee and go shopping, snowboarding, and getting cozy with a book! I love to collect glass containers in hopes to give them another use down the road. My favorite subject in school was my fine arts acting classes. Being a doula means supporting my fellow sisters through this transformative time; giving them the support and means to feel empowered throughout their pregnancy, birthing experience, and beyond.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Breastfeeding Help…And Why You Can’t Get Any

Minnesota Breastfeeding Help

I’ve been thinking about this for a long time, and I need to get this off of my chest. I’ve written a little bit previously about some of the issues moms face in getting competent breastfeeding help, but after having this conversation with many providers recently, I think it’s time to have a little bit of a discussion about the state of lactation support in Minnesota.

So, first of all, the advice that ONLY IBCLCs are qualified to help moms with lactation issues is ludicrous. When we’re talking about something that about 90% of moms start doing right after giving birth, there’s no need for stupid turf wars. There are a number of breastfeeding trainings and certifications, some with more rigorous standards than others, but just as Minnesota doesn’t mandate one specific type of training or certification for midwives who want to attend homebirths, a rational breastfeeding supporter would acknowledge that there are a few different ways that professionals can gain the information that they need to help moms figure out how to make breastfeeding work. Even the CDC, when they issue their annual breastfeeding report card, reports not only how many IBCLCs there are in a state, but also how many CLCs there are.

Second, it’s time to acknowledge that hospitals don’t have enough inpatient resources to help every mom get breastfeeding well established before being discharged. Although I don’t have any hard evidence to prove this, but anecdotally I’ve heard from families who gave birth in Baby-Friendly hospitals got absolutely no one-on-one support, perhaps because the dedicated lactation staff was either reduced or eliminated completely. Sometimes administrators think that by paying for 20 hours of trainings for all of the nursing staff, they need to recoup that money by getting rid of the experts. Or something. Whatever it is, the access to help is not improving.

Third, once moms get discharged, finding outpatient help can be nearly impossible. One health system makes everyone in their system go to one clinic in St. Paul, which may or may not have more than one IBCLC on staff. Visits from a public health nurse can help, but visits are not universally done, and not all nurses have the time to properly assist moms with breastfeeding. Many outpatient clinics report waiting lists of up to a week. And while there are LCs in private practice, most of them require moms to pay out of pocket upwards of $200 per visit, despite the fact that the Affordable Care Act mandates that insurers cover breastfeeding help at 100%. Now, there are some barriers to becoming an in-network provider, but those hurdles can be overcome. The larger issue is getting providers to understand reality versus the whispered lies and half-truths about insurance reimbursement they’ve heard in the past.

My point? Fixing our broken breastfeeding system in Minnesota is going to require that the IBCLC turf war goes away. It’s going to require that hospitals hire more lactation staff. Private practice lactation specialists need to to think outside the box (rather than only trying to build one box) to make sure families don’t have to pay out of pocket for services they shouldn’t be asked to pay for. After all, for every mother that gives up on breastfeeding sooner than desired, I’ll show you a mom who had little or no competent support. That’s just not fair to moms or babies. They deserve better.

Two things we’re doing at BabyLove to address these issues: First, Mama Cafe, free breastfeeding support on Tuesday mornings, has been around since day 1. Second, you can get one-on-one breastfeeding help in our office or in your home, with some insurances accepted, and more being added. It’s my way of not just talking the talk, but walking the walk.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Refresh Wednesday: Adult Tongue Tie Revision

Hands down, the most viewed post I’ve ever written was 5 Changes After My Frenectomy. I also wrote an update after my 2nd revision. So, for this Refresh Wednesday, I am going to pull the two pieces together, along with a couple of previously unpublished pictures.

One thing I really want to emphasize is that I am hearing more and more from older medical professionals about how babies were treated for tongue ties within moments of being born. This was standard practice, people. Routine, unquestioned, and normal. 

Anyway. Check out the full story of my tongue tie release:

“5 Changes After My Frenectomy” Originally published November 25th, 2014

Well, last week I got really brave and took the plunge: I finally was able to find a dentist who was willing to take me on as a test case to have my tongue tie released. I’ve read only the tiniest of handful of accounts from adults who had revisions, so I wanted to share with you some things that I’ve noticed one week out. PLEASE NOTE: Since I was a test case, it turned out that I had a lot to release, so we know I need more revision. 30-something-year-old tongues turn out to be a little bit more apt to bleed. It was done bleeding within 5 minutes, but I’ll be going back for more revision once this heals.

First, a bit of background: I’ve been told I was a very colicky baby for the first 4 months of my life. My mother swears it only got better when I got put on some antibiotics, but I was also having weight-gain issues. I wasn’t really gaining weight at all. I looked like a tiny, translucent bird in all of my pictures. But God bless my mother, she didn’t give up on breastfeeding. She did the best she could.

I have a wire that has been holding my front two teeth together since I got my braces off as a teenager. At some point, I did otherwise break my lip tie, but the tissue between the front teeth is thick enough that there would be a gap there if left unwired. I haven’t gone back to look at pictures from childhood to see if I can detect a lip tie. And, as we often say, almost always is there a tongue tie when there is a lip tie. And my tongue (especially now that I’m 30-something) had a VERY thick frenulum.

Just one aside: I’ve been a little stunned to see the turn that the conversation has taken in recent months on the issue of tongue ties. Specifically, there have been some very vitriolic conversations online by lactation professionals that have taken on tones of blaming parents for MAKING tongue ties an issue. I’ve seen the phrase “parents want the easy fix” pop up over and over again. I’ve read as IBCLCs INSIST that the parents just didn’t try hard enough to work with a lactation consultant on positioning and latch. Unfortunately, some of these IBCLCs have built up a wide audience, and their views can be their views, but what I keep pointing out (and it keeps falling on deaf ears), is that parents don’t get to the tongue tie conclusion easily. Some may, if they are lucky enough to give birth in a hospital with an educated pediatrician who routinely revises tongue ties. Beyond that, by the time I see families join my group, they are at a point of crisis. Real, real crisis. Telling moms they need to “try harder” and see ANOTHER lactation consultant (when often they’ve seen 2-3, or when there literally isn’t one for miles and miles around) is mean at best and unethical at worst (if a care provider can’t provide appropriate care, they are under an ethical obligation to refer to a provider who can.) I was VERY tempted to screen shot some of the very negative posts that I was reading last week and every time they ranted about tongue ties, I would replace the mentions with the phrase “Artificial Baby Milk”; the results would be interesting. (As in: “Parents who are too lazy to work with a lactation consultant look at tongue ties Artificial Baby Milk as the easy fix.” See what I did there?)

Anyway.

Here are the 5 things I’ve noticed in the last 7 days after my release:

1) The tension headaches are largely gone- If you’ve seen my video on how everything in the head is connected, you’d know that the muscles around the skull can hold a lot of tension as a result of having a tongue tightly tethered to the bottom of the mouth. I did go in for some body work with my favorite chiro right after the revision to help release the tension, and it has largely stayed away (well, until yesterday, when I had a train wreck of a day, but I’m already feeling better.)

2) I don’t carry my tension in my shoulders day in and day out- I’ve had so many massages, so many adjustments through the years, and I’ve never had any luck eliminating the tension in my shoulders for more than an hour or two. Well, now I feel like I can. Muscle memory is strong, so I have to be very conscious of my shoulders, but it’s easy to get them to relax when I try.

3) My jaw doesn’t click- OK, so this did take a couple of adjustments to get addressed, but as of now, my jaw is, for the first time ever, click-free and EVEN. I have to imagine I had this same jaw issue when I was born–and I’m pretty sure, even with the perfect latch, my jaw movement would have made it difficult to transfer milk.

4) My tongue sits on the roof of my mouth- Again, I’m still retraining myself to do this, but I can actually keep my tongue where it belongs, whereas before my tongue rested on the back of my teeth and pushed outward on them, essentially ruining the thousands of dollars paid to correct my overbite.

5) My Eustachian tubes moved- Seriously. I felt them move upward over the weekend. Not only that, but I felt them clear out, like they could drain finally. Like EVERYTHING else, it wasn’t until things had changed that I could notice how much of an impact this all made on my body.

Other adults have reported changes in their gaits, posture, and even improved thyroid function.  Time will tell if I see some of those improvements, too. It would have been nice to have this fixed as a baby, but….we all do the best we can with what we have at the time.

tongue tie release result

“Adult Tongue Tie Release Redux” Originally published December 10th, 2014.

So, today I went back for a check in and follow up on my tongue tie revision. I’ve found it really interesting to go through this entire experience. It’s brought me worlds of understanding about what babies and kids are probably going through. I’ve also noticed additional physical changes since my last post. I’ve also had some thoughts about tongue ties that aren’t proven, but I think connect some dots about things we already knew about.

First of all, this is what my tongue looked like this morning:

photo of tongue tie

Notice something that we didn’t see before? There are three attachments that you didn’t see before. As my tongue healed, they became more and more noticeable. Also, starting at the end of last week (2 1/2 weeks after the initial revision), I started to feel the tension that I had before, but on the right side of my body. It’s also interesting to note that the attachment on the right side of my tongue was the least prominent of the 3. I had severe scalp pain on Sunday. too.

There are a few things I’ve observed that I really want parents AND providers to know about:

  • First of all, these additional attachments came forward on their own as my body resettled and all of my bones and muscles shifted post-revision. So if you see attachments after a revision is healed, do not assume the professional who did the revision didn’t do a complete job. Furthermore, professionals who do revisions SHOULD do additional revisions at no extra fee, or figure out a way to make such an arrangement work.
  • There was some tissue that did almost look like it reattached, but that tissue did not affect the function of my tongue.
  • As the new attachments came forward, especially the center attachment, stretching my tongue became painful. It was very clear that this was tissue that had never been stretched like that before.
  • Post-revision body work is essential. I’ve been going in for adjustments to my head and shoulders (knees and toes) right after the revisions and then even a couple of times in between the revisions. Don’t skip this!
  • The pain afterwards has been manageable. Eating hasn’t been too bad. However, if your baby was revised and you’re breastfeeding, keep your baby skin to skin a lot that first day and nurse a lot. Breastfeeding reduces pain.
  • In addition to the stretches, rinsing with salt water and applying coconut oil to the underside of my tongue has been really helpful in the healing process.

I’ll follow up in a couple of days with additional thoughts that I have as things heal from this last revision. In the meantime, I leave you with this thought:

Tongue ties have been revised for hundreds if not thousands of years. There is already some really interesting research that’s starting to point towards the short term and long term impact of revision (or not revising).  However…there are some assumptions that are being made that really need to stop. No, Cranial Sacral Therapy isn’t the only way to do bodywork prior to and after revision, just like not assuming ENTs or any other discipline know how to properly assess what we see. Also, I like being able to measure things just as much as the next person, but I’d strongly caution anyone who wants to ONLY revise according to very rigid standards. There can be a lot of different ways these ties can exist. As I keep saying over and over, providers need to listen to parents and be willing to learn from them and each other. I’ve learned SO MUCH just by talking to parents, kids, and other adults, and some of my biggest revelations have come from consulting with other specialties. I encourage others to do the same.

New Pictures!

final tongue tie

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Am I biased? You bet.

BiasedBiased

Recently, although I’ve heard it before, the charge was leveled at me that I am biased in my classes. I was called, “Pro-breastfeeding, anti-drugs.” I spoke with a few other Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educators, and it seems that this charge is something that we’ve all heard. So, I think it’s time that I out myself for all of my biases.

First of all, I teach what’s best practice, what’s evidence-based, and what’s biologically normal. Now, keep in mind that it takes, on average, 17 years from the time something is deemed best practice (ie. safest) in maternity care before it used on a regular basis. 17 years. When new practice bulletins come out from ACOG, when the American College of Nurse Midwives issue statements, when the AAP put out new guidelines, guess what? That’s what I’m teaching. If I only taught what was being done by doctors and midwives– well, I have major ethical concerns with that. In an environment of “shared responsibility,” there’s a moral imperative to give families the information that they need to know if they are getting safe and competent care.

As for the “pro-breastfeeding” charge; I’m always interested to know why someone’s motivated to make that charge. Yes, I am a Certified Lactation Counselor. So? In classes, I teach the American Academy of Pediatric’s guidelines on infant feeding and mention what the World Health Organization’s stance is on the issue. Maybe the issue is that my classes meet the standards as set forth in the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative. Again…so? We have 6 hospitals in the Twin Cities that are certified as meeting the Baby-Friendly requirements, all of the Healtheast system, one HealthPartners hospital, HCMC, and the U of M hospital, I hardly think I hold a renegade position. If those hospitals want to maintain Baby-Friendly status, they need to make sure their childbirth education classes have the same content as mine do. With almost 90% of moms initiating breastfeeding, I’ll stand with and support them. This is not about condemning one feeding choice, it’s about helping moms reach the goals they have for themselves.

What else?

I believe that it’s important to teach an understanding of the processes that are the biological norm.

I believe in maternity care transparency.

I believe that moms need to be responsible for finding competent care. They need to learn what that looks like and how to find it.

I believe that infant car seats are usually a waste of money and, since they are more often recalled and used incorrectly, can quickly become not as safe as convertible car seats. I also hate that parents aren’t taking their babies out and more than half of kids now have flat heads by age 1.

I believe in teaching about healthy choices and safe choices.

I believe in judging a hospital and birth center by their outcomes, not their wallpaper.

Are these things really that bad? Is it wrong to make sure parents aren’t being lied to? Is it wrong to be critical of those “educators” who are giving parents unsafe information because it’s the cultural norm? Is it wrong to help parents seek out safe care? Is it bad that I advocate for the right of a mother to be listened to? I hope not.

Every day, I hear birth stories and breastfeeding stories from moms who didn’t get the education or support that they needed and either they ended up with poor outcomes or their babies did. And you know what? I’m going to stay the course, because moms, babies, and families deserve it.

-Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.