Twin Cities Patient Advocacy Resources

Twin Cities Patient Advocacy

As much as I love maternity care transparency, I also know that one of the most important things any family can do is to speak up when they feel like they aren’t being respected, if they feel like they received unsafe care, or if they need a third party to discuss treatment plans and interventions. Because this information can be very (VERY) hard to find in some cases, I decided to compile it all in on handy-dandy table. While I complied this list with maternity care in mind, please know that this information can be used for any patient.

Hospital, City Phone Number of Patient Advocate
Fairview Ridges, Burnsville 952-892-2262
Fairview Southdale, Edina 952-924-5965
Fairview Lakes, Wyoming 651-982-7851
University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis 612-273-5050
Maple Grove Hospital, Maple Grove 763-898-1003
Healtheast St. John’s, Maplewood 651-232-7967
Healtheast St. Joseph’s, St. Paul 651-232-3061
Healtheast Woodwinds, Woodbury 651-232-0002
The MotherBaby Center, Minneapolis Abbott 612-863-5391, Children’s 612-813-7393
Allina United, St. Paul 651-241-8232
Allina River Falls, River Falls, WI 715-307-6145
Allina Cambridge, Cambridge 763-688-7964
Allina Mercy, Coon Rapids 763-236-8061
Allina Unity, Anoka 763-236-3121
Allina Regina, Hastings 651-404-1158
Allina New Ulm, New Ulm 507-217-5143
Allina Owatonna, Owatonna 507-977-2650
St. Francis, Shakopee 952-428-3100
Park Nicollet (Healthpartners) Methodist, St. Louis Park) 952-993-5541
North Memorial Medical Center, Robbinsdale 763-581-0780
Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis 612-873-8585
HealthPartners Regions, St. Paul 651-254-2372
Hudson Hospital, Hudson, WI 715-531-6000
Northfield Hospital, Northfield Ext. 1177 (Quality Director) Ext. 1147 (Social Worker)
Mayo Clinic Red Wing Hospital, Red Wing 651-267-5073

Minnesota Health Facility Complaints: 651-201-4201

Minnesota Board of Medical Practice: 612-617-2130

Wisconsin Department of Health: 1-800-642-6552

Joint Commissions: 1-800-994-6610

Commission for the Accreditation of Birth Centers: 305-420-5198

If you have concerns about your care, first ask to speak to the Nurse Manager on duty.

Patient Advocates/ Representatives are usually only available during daytime business hours.

The location you are at may also have social workers on staff that you may talk to.

I have also uploaded a pdf, Twin Cities Patient Advocacy. If you are a parent or a family member looking to download it for your personal use, please feel free to do so.

If you are a doula, a childbirth educator, or another birth or health professional, please DO NOT use or reproduce without my written permission; I thank you in advance for respecting my work as you would want others to respect yours.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Social media, the internet, and motherhood: The good, the bad, and the ugly

social media

This is a blog post I’ve been wanting to write since I got home from the Lamaze/DONA Confluence last month. The last two conferences I went to spent a TON of time covering social media basics. I’m on social media personally and professionally. BabyLove has a Facebook page, a Twitter account, a Google Plus page, an account on Pinterest, and is on Instagram, too. Me, personally, for the human being behind the smiling avitar….I like twitter (though my no-nonsense, very straightforward, always honest tweets don’t always land well.)

We’ve all had to grapple with the really crummy parts of the internet and social media. I know we know they are there. But I still want to take some time to touch on some things that I’ve been thinking about for the last month, especially in relation to pregnancy and motherhood.

The Good:

OK, so there are some really great things that social media can do for pregnant and new moms. I look at the various tongue tie support groups out there and know that if it weren’t for the internet and social media, we wouldn’t have so much progress in a movement that’s been parent-driven. It’s so grassroots, so worldwide…it would have never moved forward without Facebook groups and websites. Truthfully, it would have gone nowhere, as no community would ever be able to gain enough momentum on its own.

Sometimes social media can put you into contact with people you NEVER would have otherwise been able to meet and get to know. In my case, Twitter is where my people (AKA Tweeps) are. It’s where I’ve met people who I genuinely like and enjoy chatting with, even though I’ve only met a tiny handful IRL (That’s “in real life” if you didn’t know.) And the nice thing about twitter, too, is that there are things like #ppdchat that exist to help new moms navigate the challenges of coping with our ever-changing lives. While Facebook isn’t always a great place if you want to stick to civil discussions, there have been a few times where it’s made me like someone more. And for those of us who are very, very busy moms, it can be one of the few ways we can connect with each other in any way, shape, or form.

To sum it up: not all of us become mothers with a super tight group of women surrounding us. Some of us are introverts. Some of us have social anxiety that can make going to playgroups absolutely hellish. However, thanks to the internet we can get that connection, interaction, and support we need to keep up afloat in even the choppiest water.

The Bad:

As I wrote in my previous post about not googling your birth, the internet and social media is full of way too many opinions and it’s hard to find the facts. So while it may seem easier to search for an answer yourself, it can quickly get to be too much. I’m sure your social media connections are perfectly fine people, but again– you’re just getting a lot of opinions. Now, for superficial things, like where to buy clothes for your child or ideas for parks to go to, opinions are fine. But when it comes to your health and wellbeing or your child’s health and safety, you NEED to find people who know what they are talking about. If you take someone’s opinion and they were wrong…that’s bad.

The Ugly:

You know what’s coming: the trolling, the name calling, the bullying…and I’m talking about adults, not teenagers! Because SO MUCH of motherhood that we hold near and dear (specifically birth and breastfeeding) isn’t controlled by what WE want as women and mothers, but rather by the doctors, midwives, nurses, and lactation professionals we come into contact with, when we have lost our say in the outcomes, we feel small, violated, and wronged. It’s from THAT place of anger that I think most of the vitriol stems. And it’s fair to be angry when we go to someone we trust and they refuse to help. It’s just not fair to transfer that anger to innocent women in that mommy Facebook group.

Then there will always be those moms who get a kick out of stirring up anger and controversy, spreading gossip, using social media to target moms that…OK, you know what? I don’t know why those women behave that way. Having been that target, all I know is that it sucks. I’m sure someone who specializes in this area of things would be able to articulate it better, but I find those moms are usually dealing with a huge amount of anger, a lack of self-esteem, or they just get their kicks out of manipulating other people. I don’t have any easy answers for that, especially if they are people you know IRL.

Bottom line? Being a mom is isolating in about a million ways. If you’re struggling with Postpartum Depression, Anxiety, or just floundering in general, there are some amazing resources out there. But do not belittle, name call, stalk, or harass other moms. I’m not saying you would, but…just don’t do it. And if you ask the internets for help, do so from a place that’s genuinely open to what you’ll get back. If you need to whine about something, whine away…just don’t ask for help when all you really want to say is, “THIS SUCKS.”

Of course, it can take awhile to find your place. And do only what you are comfortable with–It’s hard enough to figure out who you are as an adult without throwing the sticky layer of motherhood on top of it.

That’s what I have for today. Be kind to yourself and others.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Crystal and Veronica talk about loss and infertility

loss and infertility

It’s time for another installment where Crystal and I talk about a topic and you get to see the conversation word for word. Today, we talk about infertility and loss.

Hey Crystal,

I wanted to talk to you about pregnancy, loss, and motherhood.

I have never lost a child myself. I have, though, supported many families who have. All of those babies NEED to be remembered. However…

There is NO easy way to become a parent. It’s all tough. There is no sure-fire way to end up with a child. The road to motherhood and fatherhood is paved with pain, anguish, tears, and faith. Always. And in my mind, we are all best served by honoring that, speaking about it in realistic terms, and moving beyond the fairy tales.

Loss happens early in pregnancy, late in pregnancy, after birth, and after the adoption should have been finalized. All of them are equal. All of them are very, very sad.

You’ve experienced infertility. I want to hear your story. I want to know what your thoughts are.

-Veronica

Yes, grief and loss can definitely occur in several different realms of adding to your family. As we discussed yesterday, there is no “sure thing” when it comes to family building.

My story began in 2000, when my husband and I decided to start trying to have a baby. 18 months later, we were still not pregnant. I felt very dismissed by many professionals, because I was “only 25″ (I couldn’t be going through infertility, right?) so it took me some time to seek additional help. In addition, there were several of my friends and family getting pregnant easily (seriously, NINE in SIX months, all of whom got pregnant either unplanned or very quickly) and it was heartbreaking. I felt like nobody understood. And then people, in an effort to be helpful, say very insensitive things.
Needless to say, I ended up seeking a reproductive endocrinologist, and after two rounds of Clomid, we were pregnant. My son was born in March of 2003.

-Crystal

That’s such a true, powerful phrase: There is no “sure thing” when it comes to family building.

I feel pretty lucky, now that I think about it, that I didn’t end up with severe endometriosis symptoms until AFTER my second child was born. The same thing I’m doing now to treat it kept it at bay until my husband and I wanted to have kids. It’s entirely possible, though, that I could have had problems getting pregnant.

We also have the “F” word to think about: Failure. It’s a word I always, always try to avoid whenever I talk about pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. And then on the flip side, I HATE when birth professionals talk about “success” and their “success rate” for x. Hate it. Those words take away the mom’s ability to speak her own truth, they give credit to the professional, and discussing failure does not allow for the nuance of biology, variations of the maternity care system, and life in general.

Sorry, that was an aside.

For the most part, it’s getting easier for moms and dads to talk about loss and stillbirth publicly. Have you ever talked to moms who lost a baby 20 or 30 years ago? Their stories are HEARTBREAKING. Although, I talk to moms who had a miscarriage or stillbirth in the past year and I’m still disgusted by how those moms are treated in the hospital. It’s heaping trauma upon trauma.

So, for moms who had trouble getting or staying pregnant, once they do have a viable pregnancy, what sort of things do you recommend? I can’t imagine it’s a good idea to let the fear take over.

Yes, I have unfortunately worked with women who have lost babies long ago, and the trauma still lingers. Very sad.

For women now, getting pregnant following infertility or loss, I recommend support groups (they have some specifically for pregnancy after loss), and normalize their anxiety. This often, in and of itself, is helpful. Having their partner hear that, whether it’s with me or from their partner, can be helpful as well. Then, we work on self soothing techniques, like breathing, relaxation and mindfulness skills. Finally, I may implement some therapy skills, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) to help the anxiety and panic symptoms.

Thanks for another good conversation, Crystal!

Back at you! This is fun!

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

How car seats are like birth

Yep. I fell off the #write31days train. You get a video today.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

How did women give birth 100 years ago?

It’s Friday. I’m going to just link to some videos on the history of birth.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Don’t Google Your Birth!!!

google your birth

I’ll admit that I’m of a certain age that I remember life without internet. I didn’t get an email address until college. I didn’t get a computer until my Sophomore year. We used long-dead search engines to find things, and even then…it was iffy. And while I use social media regularly personally and professionally, There are some great things about the internet when it comes to birth, but there are some bad things, too.

One thing about the internet: It makes trying to find information completely overwhelming. Ask moms about researching everything from car seats, cloth diapers, strollers….you can research these things for months. No exaggerating. The same is true for birth. You try to search for anything, and you’ll find so many different opinions and varying pieces of information that I know it seems like all of it– ALL of it– is subjective. If you go on message boards, you know that moms are there asking questions and getting very few facts, just opinions and “well, I…..” And again, I may be showing my age, but there are some things that I ask opinions about when it comes to my life, and some things I don’t. I would never post on social media to ask others for their opinion on major medical decisions I have to make. Would I ask for their opinions on where I can find a good plumber? Sure!

Want an example of how the internet can go astray? I love using Pinterest to get info out to moms, but some of the pins I see are simply terrible, dangerous, or silly. Rather than let those pins be, I created a Bad Idea board complete with info on WHY those pins are a bad idea. And I sometimes even have BabyLove families send me pins for my bad idea board.

In classes, I teach guidelines. Guidelines aren’t rigid. Guidelines aren’t laws. They are things to help guide decision making. That’s all. Guidelines are pieces of framework by which we can look at a situation. And the guidelines I teach come from practice bulletins from maternity-care professional organizations like ACOG and ACNM and from public health groups like the CDC and WHO. And yes, when the guidelines get updated, as a professional, my job is to be aware of the changes and how best to help parents understand the new information.

The content of my classes is ever-evolving. And I’m proud of the work that I put into the level of expertise that I have. Even better than the internet? In classes, we can have an actual, interesting discussion. Something doesn’t make sense to you? You can ask your questions and I’ll never make you feel silly. You won’t have to dig through 5 pages of search results, either.

Want to use the internet? I’m saying this slightly tongue in cheek, but use the internet to sign up for classes with me. It’s better than spending the time trying to do all of the research and getting overwhelmed. Oh, and you’ll meet other families IRL (that’s social media speak for “in real life”) too.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

3 ways you can have a healthier pregnancy

Safe Birth 31 Days

As I mentioned yesterday, there are some things you can do at the beginning of your pregnancy to raise your chances of having a better birth. Now, I’m not talking about the crazy, overly alarming “stay away from everything and anything” advice you’d find in What to Expect When You’re Expecting. I’m talking about some simple things that you can do in the early months to make a big difference later on.

1)Resist the urge to give in to all of the cravings- My theory (and it’s just mine) is that our bodies don’t know it’s 2014 when we get pregnant. It doesn’t know that there are things like supermarkets, refrigerators, and pantries all full of food. Your body thinks that food is scarce and limited (as it used to be), so it unapologetically gives moms the urge to eat as much as it can. But because it is 2014, you need to balance that huge desire to eat with smart choices. Avoid too much sugar, too many empty cards, and highly processed food as much as possible. While it’s true that if you only eat Big Macs every single day that your baby will be mostly healthy, you’ll feel like garbage, and that’s no good.

2) Start getting active- OK, so I know there’s always the warnings about starting exercise, but most moms are totally cleared to start gentle things, like walking or prenatal yoga. One thing I did when I was pregnant with my second child was take water yoga. There were no prenatal yoga classes in the area I live in, so I started doing what I lovingly called “yoga with the nanas.” It was gentle, but it still got me moving. If you were active before getting pregnant, it’s usually considered safe to keep doing the things you did before. So if you were an avid runner, it’s considered OK to keep running. But always listen to your body and touch base with your doctor or midwife on what you’re doing. Oh….and no riding bikes. Your center of gravity is shifting and it’s just not worth risking falling off the bike.

3) Drink lots of water!- This is one thing that I’ve tried to take to heart just in general, but make sure you’re getting enough water. Try to avoid things with sugar, even juice. (see above– it’s just empty calories!) If you’re thirsty, it means you’re starting to get dehydrated. And if you HATE plain water, work on finding a way to jazz it up. Get a water bottle you love and can keep with you throughout the day.

Because they are so dead simple, I feel like we forget to talk to moms about how important these things are. But they are the basic building blocks that, when started in early pregnancy, will leave you feeling better the more pregnant you are. And don’t forget– you’re growing a person! That’s important work your body is doing. Help it out by treating it well.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

When loss happens

when loss happens

I’ll get back to safe and healthy birth talk tomorrow, but I need to address something: Not all babies make it to term. I’ve read many different statistics, but one of the more common estimates is that 15-20% of pregnancies end in miscarriage. About 1 out of every 160 pregnancies end in a stillbirth. It affects more people that you think.

I used to volunteer to support moms who went to the ER with a suspected miscarriage.  One of the things I’d tell them that when it happens, most moms don’t talk about it. And while the feelings of grief, such as feeling alone, isolated, and in despair are completely normal, there are resources online and in their community to help them process the loss and to find healthy ways to take steps forward.

But.

I had a conversation last week with another Lamaze Educator and with my office mate Crystal about this, and I really do need to say this: The process of creating and growing a human from only a couple of cells is an amazing, complex, almost miraculous process. As we get more advances in science, it may not seem unreasonable to think that we can find a reason for every stillbirth and miscarriage. Except, it’s just not always possible. Sometimes, the instructions get all jumbled and baby doesn’t grow as needed. Sometimes, there are problems with the placenta, an organ we barely understand. And sometimes there are diseases or infections that can lead to loss. Often, though, nobody ever knows.

Every so often, I read pieces that are critical of the maternity care system in the US and elsewhere because stillbirths still happen. I know those criticisms come from a place of profound grief. I know they come from the desire to prevent others from having to experience the loss. However, those pieces miss a point: Not all pregnancies can make it to term. A handful of stillbirths may be preventable, but not as many as advocates claim. And really, only a tiny number of miscarriages can be prevented. Loss is a part of life. But to imply that miscarriages and stillbirths can be prevented heaps a huge load of responsibility on moms that I don’t think they deserve.

I do wish more moms got checkups prior to getting pregnant to make sure they are as healthy as possible before conception. I do wish we’d stop with the societal urging to let pregnant moms eat as much junk food as possible in the name of “eating for two”. And I do wish that all care providers were better at providing prenatal care that regularly checked for things like asymptomatic UTIs. Beyond that, we need to understand that all of the science and technology in the world will never eliminate stillbirths.

We can, however, fight for those moms to get more compassionate care and support during and after a loss. We can work to train more professionals to provide appropriate therapy and support groups. We can also hold those angel babies in our hearts.

Moms don’t need us to find someone to blame. They need us to hold them up when they need help to move, breathe, or make it to the next hour. Support and remembrance.

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

How a birth can feel unsafe

Safe Birth 31 Days

Last night I posted a little bit about how my daughter’s birth wasn’t healthy…for me. I know it sounds weird to talk about birth through those kinds of optics, but it’s true. There were aspects of her birth that took a few years to heal from and process emotionally, and the physical injury took years and years of attempts to find a solution to feel better. I think it’s easy to understand why the hip injury had a negative affect on my life. But let me delve into the things that made my birth hard for me to process.

First, I had chosen to see an OB resident throughout my pregnancy with the idea that she would also be the one who would be at the birth. Yeah, no. I had no idea that she’d be perfectly happy to pop in a few times while I was in labor, but decided to scrub in on an elective surgery someone else was having when my daughter was going to be born. I also didn’t realize this would mean I’d have to deal with the “roving packs” of 1st and 2nd year residents. Well, I could have said no, but nobody had told me that.

One of the most devastating things for me was to have one of those residents check my cervix and to tell me I was dilated to 7 centimeters, only to have the next resident queue up and tell me I was only at 3cms. That sucked so much. I remember just crying and crying and just being done. As an aside, two years later I was a doula at a birth where that same resident who measured my dilation incorrectly did the exact same thing to my client. I really hope she got her ducks in a row on that one.

I had a very long labor, and I didn’t eat lunch, dinner, or anything else while I was laboring. I was ONLY allowed ice chips, even while we were waiting for an active labor pattern to start. One sweet nurse took pity on me and gave me a few crackers to eat, and I did eat some M&Ms or something my husband had brought, but… it wasn’t enough. I would go back now if I could and just say forget them and just eat. Because I know how horrible it was to be in that position, I still maintain the denying food and liquids during labor is a violation of human rights.

Finally, one of the things that still makes me angry to this day is that, one night after our childbirth classes, I went up to ask the L&D nurse who was teaching reading the Powerpoints for our Childbirth Class to ask if I HAD to have an IV line on admission, and was their standard practice. Her answer? Yep, you have to. Now, that’s not true. I could have said no. And while I can’t prove anyone’s intent, I do know after years of teaching with other nurses that some of them only have the goal of telling you what kind of patient they want to be.

That experience guided me to help other moms to realize they had options and could make decisions about their care that feel right to THEM. And while I was a little bit more inflexible in my beliefs at the beginning of my career, as a doula and educator I’ve always strived to be on the side of mom and baby. Always.

There are resources out there for parents who had a traumatic experience during the birth of a child. I encourage ANYONE who feels like they had a difficult birth to check out the Prevention and Treatment of Traumatic Birth website. And you know what? If you feel like you had a negative birth experience, it’s OK to admit it was awful. And it’s also possible, with some education and searching, to have a more positive experience with a subsequent birth.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

My daughter’s not very healthy birth

image

Today is my daughter’s 9th birthday.

When she was born, she was by all measures a “healthy baby.”

I, on the other hand, sustained an injury to my right hip. 8 years later, I finally found a treatment that fixed the pain.

There were other things that took a few years to heal. The packs of med students who lined up to check my cervix. Being denied food during a 24+ hour labor. Having an IV line upon admission that I did not consent to. (Update 10/6/14– I elaborated on these things in a post you can find here.)

This, mind you, all happened at one the very best hospitals in the world. I simply did not take seriously enough the importance of choosing the place and care provider carefully.

This stuff matters.  Trust me.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.