Choosing a Pediatrician…or Not

How to choose a pediatrician

Just as the language that we use when discussing birth tends to favor the term “OB” instead of “Doctor,” or “Midwife,” or “Care Provider,” when we talk to parents about finding someone to take their new baby to, the default term for this person is “Pediatrician.” These word choices leave out wide swaths of care providers. For births, it’s not uncommon for people to forget that there are Family Medicine doctors who also provide maternity services (and often they are the one kind of care provider where you can reasonably expect to see the person who did your prenatal care to also attend your birth), or they don’t understand that Certified Nurse Midwives are qualified, appropriate options in many places. For children, Family Medicine doctors are an alternative to Pediatricians, but there are also Advanced Practice Nurses who can do well-child (and sick child) care, such as Pediatric Nurse Practitioners or Family Nurse Practitioners. So, while there are things you need to think about finding a care provider for your baby, keep in mind that there are more options than just choosing a pediatrician.

1) Location- When you have a sick baby or a sick child, that ride to get things checked out can be very stressful. And while the best choice for you may not be the closest option, be realistic about choosing a provider who is 45 minutes away. The distance may become too much to manage. If your child is going to daycare, keep that location in mind when narrowing down options, too. Sometimes finding something largely between your home and daycare makes the most sense.

2) Access- This may be obvious, but if a clinic or provider has a full practice, it’s disappointing, but would mean that you’d have a very hard time getting appointments, especially for urgent issues. Every clinic has different arrangements for after-hour care, too. Find out what they do when parents have a sick child at 2am. Not everything is Emergency Department-worthy. Case in point: When my son had to have a pre-op checkup to have his tonsils taken out, the clinic we had been going to since he was born could not, would not find me any appointment within the 7 day window the surgeon required. I only got an appointment after escalating the issue to a manager and explaining that this was very important that he get in, because it’s hard to get surgeries scheduled. We’d had other issues with being able to get appointments, but this was the absolute last straw.

3) Bedside Manner- When you have a new, tiny baby, it can be overwhelming, and you need to find a care provider for your child who is kind, listens, takes the time to answer questions, and takes your thoughts and goals seriously. We all have bad days, but if you aren’t being treated well or respected on a consistent basis, then you need to look for another provider.  You usually have lots of options– find them!

4) Breastfeeding Knowledge- Again, moms face huge hurdles to make it to the 2 week mark with breastfeeding, much less to make it to 6 weeks or 6 months. Your baby’s care provider should be an ally to help you, not to try to discourage you. Unfortunately, not all pediatricians or other providers understand breastfeeding that well, and that lack of comfort on the subject may make them less likely to help a mom meet her breastfeeding goals. And just as study after study has found that when doctors have free samples of a medication to hand out, they are more likely to prescribe those medications to pateints, the same is true for breastfeeding.  A care provider who has free samples of infant feeding products may be more likely to default to that as the solution to a wide array of concerns, when it may not be necessary to go that route.  There are providers out there who really get breastfeeding, and if your goal is to breastfeed for any amount of time, pick someone who wants to and can help you meet that goal.

5) Are they up to date?-This is the car seat tech in me saying this, but if your baby’s care provider tells you that you can turn your baby forward facing at one year and 20 pounds, please know that that has not been an appropriate practice for at least a few years. Guess what? Best practices for car seats, medications, and everything else do change over time as we gather more and more information. I consider the car seat thing a canary in a coal mine, and I get concerned whenever I find care providers who are so blase about serious issues like car seats.

So, remember your options:

  • Pediatricians
  • Family Med Doctors
  • Pediatric Nurse Practitioners
  • Family Nurse Practitioners
  • Physician Assistants

And I also like to point out that even if you do a lot of research, think you made the right choice, but start to have any of the issues I listed above, or if your gut tells you that something is just not right, don’t be afraid to switch. It’s easy, and it’s worth it.

Anything you’d add? Let me know in the comments below!

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

A Guide to Twin Cities Birth Options gets updated

Updated Twin Cities Hospital Info

It was with a heavy and frustrated heart that I sat down this morning to change information in the eBook A Guide to Twin Cities Birth Options to reflect the unfortunate changes in the last few months that have resulted in families losing certain options at specific hospitals.

In April, 2014, Allina chose to suspend water births after the ACOG opinion piece against the practice was issued. Despite repeated statements regarding “imminent” return of the option, as of this update on 7/24/14, there is no expected start date. For this reason, my opinion is that parents should not choose any Allina hospital if they desire the option until waterbirths have actually resumed.  Read more about the AGOC opinion piece and the evidence on it over at Evidence Based Birth.

Even more upsetting is the news that Hudson Hospital will be banning VBACs as of August 31st, 2014. Mothers who show up after that date wanting to give birth vaginally after prior cesareans will be transported elsewhere. This move eliminates one of the most reliable options moms had to have a VBAC in the Twin Cities. Furthermore, this move goes against recommendations from the National Institute of Health, and during a time that we are seeing the maternal mortality rate in the US rise, is a depressing step backwards.

You can get a copy of the eBook free of charge after signing up for the BabyLove newsletter. I will update it again if any more polices change– for better or worse.

In the meantime, I still stress the need to choose care providers and places of birth carefully and deliberately. Ask questions. Trust your gut. You and your baby are worth it.

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Car safety beyond car seats

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I had a friend of mine ask for tips on how to make sure kids are safe in the car. The CPST in me says, “Car seat, duh,” but I do know there are other things that are important. While many of us spend a decent amount of time in our cars every day, it’s easy to forget that these are large motor vehicles that can injure or kill someone if proper safety steps aren’t followed. So, here are some things you need to keep in mind:

First, from a very young age, make sure your kids know that cars aren’t a place to play in, on, or around. Cars are for travel. It’s hard not to write about this and not sound like I’m doing some fear-mongering, but too many people have told me their “when things go wrong” car story. There was that viral post about a little girl being strangled by a seat belt (switchable retractors can do this! Here’s another case of the same thing happening.), or last year’s tragic story in Wisconsin about the little boy who decided to hide in a car trunk, or the kids who took the car out for a joy ride TWICE….nothing good can come out of allowing your kids to think that vehicles are jungle gyms, tents, or toys. You can, however, teach them that car are things that need to cleaned out daily.

Second, try to keep in mind that if you stop suddenly or get in a crash, anything in your car could potentially become hazardous to any of the passengers. Now, I know there was a Mythbusters episode on this that downplayed the risk to a certain extent, but I’m serious. I’ve done more than one seat check where we open up the doors to the back seat and there’s a dangerous object right in front of where a child seat has been installed. Like what? Well, I’ve seen a tire iron, a knife, a saw, and a hatchet. Yeah…..not OK. And I hate to say this, but the window shades that can roll up and suction cup to the window are notorious for falling off and could cause injuries in a sudden stop or a crash. Use the shades that are lightweight and stick directly to the window instead.

Third, please be careful about using any after-market product to make a seatbelt fit better without a booster seat. They can bring the belt up on your child’s stomach, putting him or her at a huge risk of internal injuries in the case of a crash. I’ve seen somethings lately that are supposed to go around the seat belt and have a pillow attached. I have yet to see NHTSA weigh in on this directly, but my guess is that since the product could potentially interfere with the proper function of the seat belt, using one of these could be dangerous for your child. A better option? A little c-shaped neck pillow. Oh, and don’t let them put  the belt behind their back like in the picture above.

And finally, please remember that your child learns his or her car safety habits from you. From a very early age, their little eyes are observing you every time you change lanes, whenever you tailgate, and they pay attention to if you wear your seat belt, too. My mantra is to try to be the kind of driver I want my kids to be when they are first learning how to drive. My kids are now the ages where we can talk about traffic laws and safe and unsafe choices, and I’d like to think they are learning a healthy respect for cars and driving.

Anything you’re curious about or that you’d like to add, comment below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

How to Swaddle Your Baby

Swaddling has come up in classes and Mama Cafe lately. I’ve gone back to teaching swaddling, but it’s important to talk about safety of swaddling. I’m really worried about the safety of some of the really tight swaddling products on the market now that don’t allow babies a way to break free if they get into a position that blocks their airway.  Additionally, if you are sending your baby to day care, Minnesota licensing guidelines STRONGLY discourage the practice in young babies and prohibit it for babies who can roll independently.  The AAP also encourages parents to use swaddling sparingly, and to discontinue the practice after 6-8 weeks of age.

With that said, I made this little video last night. This one is dedicated to Emily and Andrew.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Lamaze: What’s in a name?

Lamaze Childbirth Education

It’s not very often that I talk about the thought processes behind what goes on here at BabyLove; running this place requires a myriad of decisions, from minor, like what kind of wipes to buy to use in classes (I almost grabbed scented, but I was worried about someone being allergic to the fragrance), to big things, like leases and buildouts and hirings and firings. Now, I don’t have a degree in marketing or web design, but I’ve had to figure things out as I go along. Would it be better if I hired someone? Yes, but in the end I’ve had to realize that I have to weigh the costs versus benefits carefully.

But today I’m grappling with something that seems so mundane on the surface, but I’ve been struggling with it big time: Do I keep the Evening Lamaze Series and the Weekend Lamaze Series as they are, or do I change the names to “Informed Birth: Complete Childbirth Class?”

To me, 8 years ago, when I was first struck by the idea that I was called to serve moms and their families at births, I researched childbirth educator programs along with doula certifications. Doula trainings are far more frequent, so I attended that first. As I looked through the various childbirth education programs, I looked at Bradley first. I’d had friends take Bradley classes, but when I met with a Bradley teacher, she was a little hostile to the idea of doulas, and having read Dr. Bradley’s “Husband-Coached Childbirth” when I was pregnant with my daughter, there was something that didn’t seem really like it fit at all with how I looked at birth. (Orange Juice? Really?)

I also looked at Birthing From Within as a possibility.  I loved the book, but the trainings were all really far away and would cost a huge chunk of change. I checked out ICEA, too. At that time, ICEA was based out of Minneapolis, but there were no upcoming trainings, and I just could not get a good feel for what ICEA was about.

I went back time and time again to Lamaze. It made sense to me; I’m really pragmatic, so I liked that it was evidence-based, not a method. This might sound kind of silly, but when I read books about “methods,” I’m really put off by the idea that they are selling the idea that if you do x, you’re almost promised you’ll get a good/natural/ vaginal birth. I have the same feelings when it comes to books about sleep and books about toilet training, for what it’s worth.  I can’t ever shake the feeling that someone just made something up, gave it a name, and started selling books.

I was also really in love with the support Lamaze has for Doulas; back then, the 6 Healthy Birth Practices were called “Care Practices that Promote Normal Birth”. The actual care practices haven’t changed, and having a doula has always been one of the steps to having a normal/ healthy birth. After my encounter with the Bradley teacher who thought doulas were a bad idea (Yes, I know now that she’s an exception rather than the rule), I liked how Lamaze dovetailed with my vocation as a birth doula. I loved all of the care practices, too, and liked how they provided a framework to help families have the best outcomes possible.

So to me, Lamaze means healthy. Lamaze means informed. Lamaze means helping families face birth more empowered. As you’ll hear others say, Lamaze is “not your ma’s Lamaze.” I worry, though, about what parents think about Lamaze when they are trying to figure out what kind of classes to take. Do they just think about breathing? Do they think the emphasis is on vaginal births? Do they picture rows of moms sitting on the floors being coached by a spouse/friend/ family member?

I worked really, really hard to become an LCCE. Back when I certified, there were a lot more things I had to do before I was allowed to sit for the certification exam than LCCEs have to do now. I had to write an entire curriculum on my own. I had to get that curriculum approved by the Lamaze trainer. I had to teach a COMPLETE series (to two families I found via Craigslist in the library of the senior center) and have the whole thing observed by an experienced and certified educator. Only once those steps were completed was I given the green light to take the exam. I also like to point out that the Minnesota Department of Health only recognizes ICEA and Lamaze certifications for MA reimbursement.

So, I don’t know. I’ve announced the name changes in the last newsletter. But it was just now, as I was fixing the names on a page on my website, that all of these thoughts started running through my head. What do you think? Seriously. I want your thoughts.

Do I keep the names “Evening Lamaze Series” and “Weekend Lamaze Series” or do I ditch them?

Help!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Urban Myths of Pumping

Pumping myths

Somehow, mothers are more worried about pumping in breastfeeding class than they are about breastfeeding itself. That’s OK. Pumps are external, foreign objects that, when you think about them on the most basic levels, are kind of weird. I’ll avoid spelling it out for you, but there are some things I want to cover to help dispel the myths that float around out there about breast pumps.

1) “Pump and dump” isn’t real if you imbibe: If you search various websites for information about drinking and breastfeeding, you’ll get page after page of warnings telling you that even though the amount of alcohol in breastmilk is minuscule, your baby is little, so…it might be dangerous. I, on the other hand, really like science, I think things like osmosis are real, so when I saw actual calculations of the levels of alcohol in breastmilk, I thought that was pretty cool. ( Side note: This blog post was actually copied and pasted on the Dr. Jack Newman website from the original author without attribution, which is a really jerk thing to do.) Bottom line? Don’t pump and dump. Oh, and for all the bluster about booze and breastfeeding, we tend to forget that the really dangerous thing is parenting while drunk.

2) You should start pumping in the hospital: One of the dumbest things a nurse can do is to hand a mom a pump an hour after delivery to see if mom is “making any milk.” Colostrum is milk, but it’s thick, and trying to pump colostrum is like trying to suck honey through a straw. It just doesn’t work very well. Hand expression does seem to work better, though. (Actually, all moms should learn how to hand express, because technology sometimes breaks or you forget a part, or life happens and you can’t have a pump with you 24/7.)

3) You need a gigantic stash of breast milk in the freezer before you go back to work: For one thing, you’ll be pumping milk for your baby while you’re at work. In Minnesota, you have both state and federal law protecting your right to do so. The milk you pump today will feed your baby tomorrow.  Is it a good idea to have 40 ounces or so in the freezer before you go back to work? Sure, but take it easy on the pumping. Pump a few ounces in the morning, and save that. Don’t pump after every feeding just so you have have a ton of milk. Your body will think you’ve picked up an extra baby somewhere and will start making enough milk for 2. As much as we talk about low supply, lots of problems can stem from oversupply, such as infections, baby spitting up copious amounts of milk, and baby choking on the fast flow on milk.

4) The amount you can pump is proof of the amount of milk you’re making: Simply put, the amount of milk you can pump is proof of…the amount of milk you can pump. There are a myriad of reasons why moms have a hard time pumping, be they due to poor-fitting flanges, a motor that dies quickly, or just not being able to respond to the pump the way your body responds to your baby. Any time a mom tells me they have a sudden drop in pumping output. my thought is immediately the pump broke, not that the breast broke.

5) You should pump so that your partner can feed the baby one feeding a night so you can sleep: Supply meets demand, and if you aren’t getting up for a feeding that your baby needs and you’re not pumping while someone else is bottle feeding baby, your body will stop making as much milk and potentially lead to an infection. Oh, and numerous studies have actually found that breastfeeding moms actually get MORE sleep than moms who bottle feed.

I’ve got more myths on my list, but 5 is a good number. Anything you think needs to be added?

Warmly,

Veronica

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

BabyLove Welcomes Crystal Clancy, MA LMFT!

Mental Health Pregnancy Eagan

I am very excited to be able to finally reveal the identity of the therapist who is joining BabyLove on August 15th; Crystal Clancy is launching her private practice by seeing patients at BabyLove.

Crystal has long been a supporter of BabyLove; she has come to Mama Cafes and helped facilitate Birth Story nights. She is the co-director of Pregnancy and Postpartum Support Minnesota, and our hope is by being at the same location, it’ll be less stressful for families to get the education and support they need.

From Crystal’s website:

I am a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) a family/divorce mediator, and a parenting consultant, trained under Rule 114 guidelines, and on the Supreme Roster of ADR Neutrals in the state of Minnesota. My counseling perspective is primarily solution-focused. I believe that people have solutions within themselves and sometimes need help looking within to use those solutions. I help people focus on making the future more hopeful.

Insurance: Most major insurances are accepted; check with your carrier or contact patient registration at the number below to verify coverage. I also offer private pay rates on a sliding-fee scale.

My journey to building a family came with both infertility and postpartum depression. Realizing how little help there was available, I decided to build a practice in these areas, and helped form the organization Pregnancy and Postpartum Support MN (PPSM). My goal is to help you navigate this stage of life so that you know you are not alone!

In addition to providing couples and divorce counseling and mediation, Crystal is skilled and experienced in the area of perinatal mental health, including:

  • Infertility
  • Third Party Reproduction
  • Adoption
  • Pregnancy Loss
  • Infant loss/Stillbirth
  • Birth trauma
  • Ante/postpartum disorders
    • Anxiety
    • Depression
    • OCD
    • Psychosis
    • Bipolar

On August 12th, from 6:30 to 8:30, Crystal and I will be hosting another Night of Birth Stories at BabyLove; this event will give moms a safe and respectful place to share and hear stories of births. We welcome all moms to share their stories, if they had fast births, slow births, vaginal births, cesarean births, medicated births, or unmedicated birth. Moms are also welcome to come listen to others without having to share if they don’t want to share.

And finally, as BabyLove’s third birthday gets closer, Crystal and I will be putting together a bash to celebrate 3 years of BabyLove and to be a “grand opening” for Crystal’s practice. Stay tuned for more details on that!

Welcome, Crystal!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

When the internet is WRONG

Plan on giving birth and parenting only by the wisdom shared online? Not so fast.  In the last 2 days I have found stunning examples of really terrible information on the internet from very popular sources. Since the internet is WRONG sometimes (most of the time?), let me do a take down of each one:

1) Dr. Sears goes from AP to WTH?

dr sears is a moron

 

Dr. Sears, nothing about this is based on any scientific evidence. If you go to real evidence-based sources, like Kellymom.com, you’ll find out that very, very rarely is baby actually affected negatively by mom’s diet. As I said yesterday, can you say #firstworldproblems? Then again, Dr. Sears and his family lost all credibility with me when they started selling supplements and “certifications.” I’m cynical, but once someone can make money off of steering you towards certain things that probably amount to little more than snake oil at the worst and placebo at the best, they are no longer credible sources of info.

What’s even worse is if you actually click on the link, the information is almost straight out of a “breastfeeding” book from Abbott Technologies from the 1980s. Broccoli causing gas? Umm…no. I half-expected to see the old “toughen up your nipples” advice. Seriously, Dr. Sears….WTH?

2) Dear Babycenter: Who are these “experts”?

My sister texted me this article yesterday on Babycenter about how to choose a convertible car seat. It looks like it’ll be helpful, but then you get to this part:

But experts say young babies are safer in an infant car seat. Many parents say their newborn seems to be swimming in a convertible seat, and they have to use head rests, towels, or other cushioning to prop him safely in place until he grows into the seat.

Experts? Do they mean “the teenager we asked who was stocking shelves at Babies R Us”? There’s NOTHING wrong with adding rolled blankets beside a baby in a car seat to keep him more secure. You often have to do that in an infant seat too. Oh, and those head rests? Yeah, you can’t use them if they didn’t come with the seat.  If the author actually ASKED a real expert, they would tell them that a convertible seat is completely safe for newborns. In some cases, they can actually have safety features that the infant seats don’t.

They go on to say:

A convertible car seat is also less convenient for you at first: Convertible seats are heavy. And unlike infant car seats, they have to be installed in the car rather than clicked into a base that’s installed in the car – so you can’t easily take them in and out of the car, carry your baby in them, or snap them into a stroller.

Yes, convertible car seats are heavy. Yes, they are supposed to stay in the car. Not sure if you knew this, but CAR SEATS ARE FOR CARS! By keeping the seats in the car, it’s a lot less likely that you’ll end up with a seat that’s not secured properly. By keeping the car seat in the car, it also means your baby won’t develop a flat head– a relatively new phenomenon that’s almost always caused by keeping babies in car seats, strollers, swings, and bouncy seats for an unhealthy amount of time. That infant car seat with a handle shouldn’t be used as a “convenient” way to lug your baby around. It’s to keep your baby safe in a car. That’s all. If you want accurate information on convertible car seats, check out my post here, and learn about which seats I like as a CPST here.

3) Canadian paper potantially misunderstands FDA data

Somehow, I missed this article last week on the “dangers” of Zofran. . But yesterday, someone shared this critical takedown of the claims that the Toronto Star makes. However, in this article from this morning, it turns out that there is a larger investigation going on with regards to the Canadian adverse events reporting. Since the FDA will take reports from all over the world, the data that the FDA has from Canada is being used to get transparency in Canada’s own adverse events reporting system.

Truly, if you have concerns about medication, please talk to your doctor or midwife.

OK, that’s what I have for today. See anything online that needs a dose of reality? Link in the comments below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.