Eagan GRACE Support Group dates

Image via Flickr by TschiAe, used under a Creative Commons license
Image via Flickr by TschiAe, used under a Creative Commons license

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starting in September, BabyLove will be a location for the Eagan GRACE Support Group.  Missing GRACE is a non-profit located in Rogers, MN, and we will be another location for families to receive support twice a month.

In the support group we have topic led discussions on subjects including: differences in male/female grieving, relationships with friends and family through the grieving journey, coping with holidays/anniversary dates, health issues/concerns, subsequent pregnancy fears, and other related topics.  On occasion the group will do an activity that is helpful for the grieving process. (Scrap booking, crafts, video, having a guest speaker, candle light memorial service, etc.)

We are unfortunately unable to offer child care during the meeting.

Please email us at info@babylovemn.com or call us at 651-200-3343 for details and to let us know if you plan to attend one of the meetings.

If you are a professional who works with families that would benefit from this support group, please contact us for more information and for materials to hand out to families.

2013 Schedule

Generally, Meetings will take place the first Monday of the month from 10am-noon and the third Friday of the month from 6-8pm.

September 20th, 6-8pm

October 2nd, 10am-noon

October 18th, 6-8pm

November 6th, 10am-noon

November 15th, 6-8pm

December 4th, 10am-noon

December 20th, 6-8pm

Update: Eagan Support Group Dates is a sheet we’ve put together with information to hand out. 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Primary Cesarean Rates by Clinic

We’ve posted about MN Community Measurement report that came out in early 2013 that listed primary cesarean rates, and we talk about it in our free eBook, A Guide to Twin Cities Birth Place Options.  You can see the full list starting on page 192 of the full report (link above), but we wanted to pull out the clinics with the 10 lowest primary cesarean rates (which the report defines as the better outcomes) and the 11 highest primary cesarean rates in the 5 county metro area.  Why 11? There was one clinic listed that we can not figure out where it actually is, so if you know where Women’s Health Center is located, please note it in the comments.  The actual percentage wasn’t listed, so if you want to see how it stacked up, you’ll have to visit the full report.

  Clinics with the Lowest Rates (Lowest is first)
1. Hennepin County Medical Center- Brooklyn Park
2. Fairview Andover
3. Oakdale OB/GYN
4. Allina Clinic- Blaine
5. Healthpartners- White Bear Lake
6. North Clinic- Maple Grove
7. OBGYN Specialists
8. Park Nicollet- Shakopee
9. AALFA Family Clinic
10. Metro OBGYN- Maplewood
  Clinics with the Highest Rates (Highest first)
1. Park Nicollet- Chanhassen
2. Paul Larson OBGYN
3. OBGYN West- Eden Prarie
4. Allina Clinic- Shoreview
5. Southdale OBGYN- Edina
6. Aspen Medical Group- Bloomington
7. Stillwater Medical Group- Lakeview Campus
8. Aspen Medical Group-Maplewood
9. Lakeview Clinic- Waconia
10. Women’s Health Center
11. Metro OBGYN-Woodbury

The report was limited only to care providers who actually DO cesareans, so midwives and family med doctors were not included in the data.  Again, if you read the full report (truly, you’ll only have to read through 10 pages), you’ll see that only 3 metro-area medical groups were labeled as “Highest Performers”: Hennepin County Medical Center, Healthpartners, and North Clinic.

Soapbox moment:  We would like to see the next report cover episiotomies, since their use is almost never appropriate evidence-based care, and we’re starting to hear too many stories about certain groups doing them routinely.  Seems like an easy thing to track.

If you have any insight to share, please feel free to offer it in the comments below!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

7 Hospital and Birth Center Tour Questions

I gave hospitals tours for 4 1/2 years when I taught childbirth education at those facilities.  On every single tour my goal was to knock the socks off of every family and make them really, really happy that they were going to give birth at my hospital.  It helped that the places I worked were pretty good, but I also understood that the tour is a part of the marketing package.  It would get to the point where I’d be able to give the tours in my sleep– same hand gestures, same lame jokes– but the smart parents would ask the right questions and notice just the right things that would bring me back into the tour.  There are also things that I always wanted people to ether notice or ignore.  So, here are things you NEED to ask about:

  1. Ask the tour person about routine interventions- - No matter what kind of birth you want, it’s important to find a place that doesn’t do conveyor belt births.  high intervention rates often mean that things are done for very little medical reason.  And, as Lamaze Healthy Birth Practice #4 states, “Avoid unnecessary interventions”.  Does the tour guide not know?  Ask if one of the nurses would be able to tell you. They can.  They get those stats. And if they refuse, you might want to rethink that birth place.  Interventions to ask about: Cesarean rate, Epidural rate, Episiotomy rate, and if all moms need to get either a Heparin/Saline Lock or an IV.
  2. Ask where the birth balls, the birth stool, and the squat bars are– There should be lots of them.  Lots.  And the balls should be inflated.  Well, there only needs to one or two birth stools.  But the nurses should know where they are and should be MORE than happy to get them for you.  Nobody knows where they are? Again, you’ll have a cookie-cutter birth that might not be the healthiest or safest for you or your baby.
  3. Ask if babies end up spending a lot of time in the nursery– Better yet , check to see how many babies are in the nursery when you tour.  Lots of babies can indicate either that the hospital does a lot of cesareans. or that the nurses pressure moms to send baby to the nursery.  While it might seem that moms are better off sending babes away, nothing could be further from the truth. (See Lamaze Healthy Birth Practice #6.)
  4. Ask if moms who are not on pain meds are allowed to walk the halls during labor– The answer should always be yes.  There should be no sighs.  There should be no eye-rolling.  Most importantly, there should be a way to continuously monitor mom, even if she’s out of her room. (Why is this important?  See Healthy Birth Practice #2)
  5. If there’s a waterbirth tub, ask how often it’s used, and by whom– Only  a few years ago, the number of places in the Twin Cities that offered waterbirth dwindled to a small handful.  Now, with only a couple of exceptions, most hospitals “allow” waterbirth, and most have a plumbed-in tub or two for moms to use.  That’s great, but some places aren’t actually doing any waterbirths whatsoever in those grand tubs, so they end up being a bait and switch.
  6. Ask what they do to get meals for moms who give birth at 2am– Baby comes out, and you’re HUNGRY (rightfully so).  What can the hospital do to feed you in the middle of the night?  Do they have box lunches?  Frozen dinners?  Can you order in from some place?  Or…..do you get crackers?
  7. And, finally, watch how the staff interacts– While you’re walking through the hallways between rooms, try to pay attention to how the staff treats the tour group and each other.  Is the desk full of chatting people (aka not paying any attention to moms)?  Do they seem happy? Tense?  Do they smile at you?  Or ignore you?  How they treat each other and the tours is a huge indicator of the overall atmosphere.  If they aren’t positive and welcoming from the first minute they see you,  then watch out.

Have you toured a hospital or birth center and noticed something that either gave you peace of mind or made you want to run away?  Share it in the comments below!

 

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Car Seat Event Recap

We held our very first Car Seat Recycling collection event on Sunday, June 30th.  We had no clue what to expect, but this car seat geek was kind of excited to see what people were going to bring in.  We saw old seats, some expired special needs seats, some broken seats, some puked in seats…..the whole kit and caboodle.

photo (3)

I’ll admit I was a little upset with the guy who drove up with a back seat FULL of seats, took a look at the sign that said that the fee the Recycling Association of Minnesota charged $10 per seat, complained, and said he’d drop off the seats to Goodwill.

People?

No respectable thrift store will take used baby gear, ESPECIALLY car seats.  And really, why  anyone would think someone else’s kid deserves an unsafe seat is beyond me. There are lots of ways that people can get new, safe seats if they can’t afford them.  But you have 2 choices with old seats:  garbage, or recycle through the ReSeat program. That’s it. Sorry.  I’ll put my soapbox away.

The highlight was getting this tray shield car seat.  It was my goal to get at least one, and I did.  Yippee!

photo (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ll try to do this again once more this year.  A HUGE thanks to Christina, postpartum doula and dear mama friend of ours for all of her help. All 19 seats will be headed to Chaska on Wednesday to be recycled.

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE
Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.