BabyLove’s Featured Family: Donncuan, Kelsey and Charles (Part Two)

On Monday, we kicked off our new blog feature where we highlight various BabyLove families with an interview with new mom Kelsey.  Today we get a dad’s perspective from Donncuan!

So, far, what has been your biggest joy in becoming a father?

Watching my son grow and develop. I never thought that seeing him hold his head up on his own, or hearing him make all those funny baby squeals would make me so proud. It is a joy just to see him smile every day.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve faced since your baby was born?

Learning what cry means what was quite a challenge. He would cry, and I would get so frustrated because I couldn’t figure out what was wrong. Of course, it was always the last thing I had done. If I had just fed him, he needed to be fed again. If I had just changed him, he needed to be changed again. Now I can tell what is bothering him, and he hardly ever cries any more. I suppose that means he finally has me trained J

How has your relationship with your partner changed since the birth of your baby?

I think we are more loving to each other now than before, in some ways. We both understand that it is a challenge to take care of our boy, so we both try extra hard to show our love and appreciation of the other. Whether it’s taking turns making dinner, or just holding him so the other can take a shower.

Did you feel that your childbirth classes prepared you for birth? How so?

In some ways, yes. Having a general overview of what was going to happen was very helpful, as well as having some tools and tricks to try to help my wife with labor. In the end, the best thing I could do to help my wife was just being there and focusing on her and the baby. However, I don’t think that if I had 10 years of training that I would be totally “prepared”. In my experience, our son’s birth was both scary and exciting, but I was never afraid for his, or my wife’s, health, and I credit that to our child birth classes and our midwife.

What is one thing you think all parents should know before the birth of their baby?

Don’t make any other plans for a few weeks! I thought that we would have our baby, and that I would go stir crazy sitting around the house watching him. It’s not like that at all. You’ll find yourself staring at him, feeding him, changing him, and when you look at the clock next, its 11:30 at night. Have a good support structure “just in case” you need a few hours break. Also, for the Mom’s, you are not a bad mother if your baby cries, or you get angry, or frustrated. You will spend days second guessing your decisions, from immunizations, to feeding times, to what kind of diapers to buy. Make a decision and go with it, the only thing that really matters is the love you have for your child. Babies don’t hold grudges. They aren’t going to hate you later in life because you accidentally nick them when you are trimming their toenails. Fill your baby’s heart with love and the little stuff will work itself out.

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

BabyLove’s Featured Family: Donncuan, Kelsey and Charles (Part One)

Note:  This week we are starting a new series of pieces of interviews with BabyLove families.  Today, we hear from Kelsey, and we will hear from Donncuan later this week.  Enjoy!

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So far, what has been your biggest joy in becoming a mother?

My biggest joy is two-fold… seeing the smile on my son’s face and the way my husband cuddles with our son. My mother was absolutely right when she told me that one cannot describe what it’s like to have children—one much experience it for one’s self. It’s true—I cannot put to words how fantastic motherhood is.

What has been the biggest challenge you’ve faced since your baby was born?

BREASTFEEDING! I had no idea how challenging it was going to be for me. I just assumed it came naturally (and it does with a little know-how), but there were a couple mitigating factors that made it difficult for my son and me. Difficult time latching, using a nipple shield, milk supply affected because I was stressing out… Ultimately, I learned that I needed to calm down, not stress out over every little thing, and know that it’s okay if you need help (anywhere from using a lactation consultant to formula). There are a lot of resources to take advantage of when you need help—use them. (Editor’s note: we offer Mama Cafe for families weekly to help with the simpler breastfeeding issues and refer to highly skilled IBCLCs for complex issues.)

Where and how have you found support for yourself when you’ve needed it?

My mother. I cannot even begin to explain how helpful she has been to me. She’s been there for me physically and emotionally. She did a fantastic job raising my five siblings and me, so I know that she comes from great experience when she gives me her advice.

Did you feel that your childbirth classes prepared you for birth? How so?

ABSOLUTELY! In my humble opinion, I believe that every expecting parent-to-be should take a childbirth class. My husband and I learned a myriad of things—we did ourselves a favor when we took the childbirth classes. I think we would have been ill-prepared as parents if we had not taken the classes. The most important thing I took away from the classes was the knowledge of the stages of labor. I was able to recognize each one of the stages as I was experiencing them because I was taught them. It made my birthing experience that much more enjoyable because I knew things were progressing and had an idea of what to expect.

What is one thing you think all parents should know before the birth of their baby?

Birthing options: the hospital, a birth center, or at home. Before I got pregnant, I just assumed everyone went to the hospital to give birth. My husband and I did our own research and really got informed on our options. Ultimately, we chose home birth. It was a fantastic experience and we will definitely be doing it again (so long as the subsequent pregnancies are low-risk).

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Yes, moms, each stage is special

As I face the prospect of sending my youngest to all-day Kindergarten next year (HOORAY!  He’s so ready to go!), I find that more and more I am catching myself in the moment, able to appreciate my children for exactly the stage they are in right now.  7 1/2 years of motherhood has taught me (as you’ll read below) that every stage is amazing and challenging and no one age is better than another. I’m finally starting to enjoy my kids, just as they are.  Below, an essay I wrote for a newsletter last year. Enjoy! 

Veronica

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It’s taken awhile, but one year after painting the living room walls, we’re finally working on getting paintings and pictures hung up.  A couple of shelves inspired the need to get a large chunk of it done a couple of weekends ago.  The kids’ school pictures had remained in the envelopes they came in until I finally could find another 8 by 10 frame to put Ronan’s picture in.  We have all of Lily’s pictures, starting from when she was a baby, stacked up inside one frame, the newest picture on top. So, as I was adding in her 1st grade picture, I took a moment to flip through the rest of them. I could not believe how quickly she had changed and grown, especially these last couple of years.

 

When she was first born, like all new parents, we found the demands of having a new baby more challenging that we expected. My husband would say, probably as a way to say that the difficulties of having a newborn would pass, “I can’t wait… .”  As a new mom, I would always scold him whenever he started a sentence with that phrase.  “Yes, we can wait”, I would tell him.  “We can enjoy this age, right now, before it’s gone.”  However, as years went by, another child was added, and life got more complex, as it does once children start going to school, I joined in on the wishing away the present, in hopes that the next age would be easier.

 

Looking through the stack of pictures, the fat, baby face slowly thinning, her limbs getting longer and leaner, I was taken aback by how much of the changes I don’t remember.  I’m sure I’m not the only one to do this, but I just hadn’t been paying that much attention at the time.  And truthfully speaking, I had such a difficult time adjusting to my new baby that I just hoped to make it to the end of each day.  Later that week, when talking about our (normal yet challenging) 3 year old son, I caught myself starting in on a sentence that started, “I can’t wait until… “, but stopping right as those words left my mouth.  I thought of my sadness and knowing how quickly those years can pass. I also know very well by now that each age has its own joys and challenges. So you know what?  I can wait. It might be difficult some days, but I am working very hard to accept my kids for where they are at right now, because one day, I will again take out the pictures to add a new one, and I want to be able to know I appreciated each age, rather than wishing we’d have moved on to the next.

 

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Small Talk– The easiest way to learn about sign language for your baby and toddler

I signed with both of my children from about the age of 6 months on.  I had learned about infant and toddler signing when I was an assistant teacher in a toddler room 10 years ago, and I loved using it as a communication tool with both of my kids.  Both of them were able to communicate with me before they had the vocal ability to do so, and I will still sign with my oldest if we need to communicate discretely.

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We were very excited to have the chance to bring Susan C. Hagel, MS, CTRS (above) and creator of Small Talk to our space for classes.  She has been teaching for over 30 years and has offered Small Talk baby sign language classes for the last 12 years. The class in January was the first time she had taught in the South metro ever, so we were excited to have her.  I attended the class, and was surprised at what I learned. Some major take aways:

  • The parents need to be the primary teacher of signs: Some parents are starting to rely on DVDs to teach their children signs.  However, signing is a communication tool, and if a baby or toddler is going to learn how to use the signs to convey ideas and feelings with a caregiver, they need to learn and practice with their caregiver.
  • Susan did a great job of helping tell the parents how to best start signing with their babies based on their ages.  This underscores how very helpful in-person classes can be; the information can be tailored to everyone’s needs and everyone has a chance to ask the questions that apply to their own situation.
  • Some of those signs are confusing, and it’s immensely helpful to have an expert show the sign, explain how it’s done and even explain how you can remember what the sign is.  Even a month later, I still remember the sign for grape, something I did not know before!
  • The book Susan gives with her class has around 60 signs; one of the most important things I learned what how to introduce signing, with what sign, and when to introduce more signs.  I know looking at books with a bunch of signs can be overwhelming, so getting expert advice on starting off hopefully will make the process easier and less frustrating for everyone involved.

The next Small Talk class at BabyLove is next month.  For more information and to register, check out the class page on our website.

Happy signing!

 

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

NICU Options in the Twin Cities

UPDATE 2/14/13: After posting this, I got an update saying Children’s Minneapolis was a Level IV, and St. Paul was a Level III. From this AAP chart, you can see the level designation that were in place until last August.  After that, the AAP issued these revised guidelines, which helps explain the “Level IV” and “Level III” designations some of the hospitals are now going by.  However, some places are still sticking with the old levels, so there will be a mix of both below.  I have corrected some errors below.

I’m not even sure what got me thinking about this, but this morning, I woke up curious what the different Twin Cities hospitals had for options for Special Care Nurseries and NICUs.  I knew there were different levels and was aware of some of the differences from hospital to hospital, but t struck me that I didn’t know the information for every hospital.  It took me some digging online, a few phone calls, and even a couple of well- answered tweets, but I was able to put this little chart together. (More information on the various level designations can be found here.)

Hospital NICU Level How many weeks gestation?
Children’s St. Paul (United) IIIb  III 24 weeks
Children’s Minneapolis (Abbott) IIIc  IV 22 weeks
Hennepin County Medical Center IIIb 23-24 weeks
Maple Grove II Info not found
Methodist II 32 weeks
Mercy II  Info Not Found
North Memorial Medical Center III 23 weeks
Regions II 30 weeks
Fairview Ridges IIIa 30 weeks
Fairview Riverside (Amplatz Children’s) IV Info not found
Saint Frances II Late preterm
Saint Joseph’s II 34 weeks
Saint John’s IIIa 28 weeks
Fairview Southdale IIIa 30 weeks
Unity II 34 weeks
Woodwinds II 34 weeks

*The Level IV designation is used to indicate a very specialized level of care is available  but is not recognized formally by the American Academy of Pediatrics as a designation.  (See above)

Now, as I used to tell families on hospital tours, I hope you never have to see the insides of any of these nurseries, but the information is still good to know, especially if you have a higher risk pregnancy.  For low risk pregnancies, this is probably not an important factor– making sure you give birth in the place you are most comfortable with a care team that you trust is of utmost importance   In the cases where there is a greater chance of complication, it might be a good idea to plan to give birth at a hospital where they will have the capacity to care for your child, rather than give birth at one hospital and have your baby transferred elsewhere.  Please note– this is by no means the only thing you need to consider when choosing a place of birth.  However, for pregnancies with a higher level of risk, this is something to think about!

Did you consider NICUs when choosing a place of birth?  Is this information helpful?  Sound off below!

 

Warmly,

 

Veronica

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

5 Breastfeeding Issues Your Care Provider Might Miss

Class at BabyLoveI’m always saddened and amazed how many moms didn’t met their breastfeeding goals because the people they trusted to help them didn’t have the knowledge or skills to actually help solve breastfeeding problems.  Breastfeeding is an interesting thing; there are factors for both mom and baby that can make breastfeeding a challenge, and some of the things that come up are not known about by the doctors, nurses, midwives, doulas, and even lactation consultants that mothers rely on in the early days of breastfeeding.  The impulse is usually to treat the symptoms, but not the underlying cause.

If you think that you or your baby might be dealing with one of these issues, please find a provider who is familiar with the problem and discuss it with him or her.  I’m writing this for educational purposes only, and it is not meant to replace medical advice.

1) Tongue tie and lip tie

OK. This is one thing that we know happens, but there’s still way too many car providers TOTALLY in the dark about the condition.  With tongue time, the latch can look perfect, but the frenulum (the piece of skin under baby’s tongue) is too tight or too ling and does not allow baby to stick out his or her tongue all the way, making breastfeeding difficult for baby and painful for mom. Left untreated, a tongue tie can lead to many issues in adults, including speech impediments, migraines, and, this doctor thinks there might be a link to sleep apnea.  If I can get on my soapbox for a second, assessment for tongue and lip tie needs to be a part of the normal newborn assessment RIGHT AFTER BIRTH; if there’s a problem, it can be corrected swiftly and everyone will be happy.  You can find more information and resources here, but by FAR the best thing that I’ve found for parents (and care providers who aren’t in the know) is this fun little e-book. It has pictures and talks about why and how to have tongue and lip ties addressed.

2) Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER)

When we talk to moms about breastfeeding, we talk about the Oxytocin and the Prolactin that is produced and the feeling of love and bonding that happen as a result of  these hormones.  For some moms, though, the act of breastfeeding can lead to feeling of sadness, anxiety, or other negative emotions during the milk ejection (aka “letdown”) part of the breastfeeding process. So while the breastfeeding is supposed to be a positive experience, moms with D-MER have a negative experience every time they feed their babies.  Fortunately, there are treatments for D-MER.  One of my favorite resources for information on D-MER and treatments is D-MER.org.  They have treatments, resources, and even links to Facebook groups for mothers who are looking for information and support.

3) Thyroid Problems

Thyroid and other endocrine issues can cause a whole list of issues, but they also can lead to low supply.  My copy of The Breastfeeding Answer Book states that about 17% of mothers have a thyroid issue that affects supply (p.567) They can even arise after birth in moms who don’t have a history of thyroid issues.  Whenever a mom is facing a true, persistent low supply issue, it can be a good idea for her to visit an endocrinologist for tests of all her hormone levels. With proper treatment and on going monitoring, mothers often experience a rapid improvement in milk supply. For more information, check out the information listed on Kelly Mom.

4)Over supply/ Overactive Letdown

While low supply is a well-known issue, over supply can also create issues for a motherbaby pair.  It can result in baby refusing to feed, excessive spitting up, or pain for mom with letdown.  Some mothers just naturally have a large supply or forceful letdowns, other can fall into the issue by taking galactogogues (herbs and medications meant to increase supply) when no real need exists or by pumping unnecessarily.  In my opinion, we are no so over-fixated on low supply (for better or worse) that mothers are told to try to up supply unnecessarily, leading to too much milk for some moms. And for other moms, they start pumping too much, and up supply so much that it can lead to too much milk (basically, their body almost thinks that there are two babies to feed– the real baby and the pump baby.)  To solve this issue, we usually have mom stop taking the galactogogues right away, or start to cut back on pumping to see if supply moderates and baby is doing better. The other half of the solution is to help baby feed in a more upright position and to place baby is such a way that he or she can better control the force of the flow.  Usually laid-back breastfeeding can make it easier for both mom and baby.

5) Vasospasm

Sometimes nipples can turn white as a result of an incorrect latch.  Sometimes, though, the nipple can turn white as a result of vasospasm.  This can lead to pain, tingling, and blue or bring red nipples as the blood flow returns to the nipple.  This doesn’t make breastfeeding impossible, but it is a condition that can be managed by the application of dry heat, keeping the nipple warm right after baby unlatches, and by reducing the amount of caffeine and alcohol mom ingests.  More information on vasospasm and Raunaud’s Phenomenom can be found on this great Kelly Mom article.

Hopefully all of these things are helpful.  Did you have one of these breastfeeding issues go undiagnosed for a long time?  How did it affect your breastfeeding relationship? Sound off below!

Let me know if you have questions!

Warmly,

Veronica

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Bum and Belly Drive Wrap Up

We ran the Bum and Belly Drive through last November and December, so it might seem like this wrap up post is long overdue.  Well, kind of.  But believe it or not, we JUST had the last set of donations sent off to The Diaper Drive this past Tuesday.  So now, it’s time to let you all know how it went.

Through all of our partners, we were able to collect a very good amount of donations this year.  We held a sorting party on December 19th, and we were SO THANKFUL to all the kind women who showed up to help sort through everything.  We had fun, too!

Ultimately, the donations went to 360 Communities, Everyday Miracles, the local chapter of the Cotton Babies Share the Love Program, and The Diaper Drive.  Through the process of collection donations and advertising our drive, we always have other organizations reach out to us, and we do our very best to accommodate them.  In the case of the Share the Love Program and 360 Communities, we were completely unaware of them until they reached out to us.  Both serve families in our immediate area, and we hope o be able to work with them more in the future.

With that, we want to thank all of the families who donated items, the women who came to sort, and of course, our partners who helped up collect the donations.  Your support makes this possible!  So enjoy the pictures, and we look forward to our next drive!

Warmly,

Veronica and Brittany

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Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.

Guest Post: Postpartum Doula Care: What to Expect

We are crazy busy getting ready for our event tonight at Color Me Mine (watch for a post on this soon!), so we’re so thankful for Kathryn Orr, who volunteered her guest post on postpartum doulas.  Thanks, Kathryn!  Send her some love and check out her website and facebook page, listed at the bottom of this post.
Originally published on motherbabybirth.blogspot.com.

Are you wondering if you need postpartum doula support? Or if you should gift it to your sister, daughter, friend? Or maybe, what the heck is a postpartum doula? People often aren’t sure where the lines are drawn between birth doula care and postpartum doula care. So here I’ll outline four overarching ways that postpartum doulas care for families during the postpartum time (right after birth until about 3 months postpartum).

Mama Care

A postpartum doula is trained to care for mamas during the postpartum time, physically and emotionally.

Those of us who are also birth doulas have detailed knowledge of the physical healing process that takes place after birth, whether vaginal or cesarean. We can answer questions, recommend natural ways to enhance healing, and provide resources. Our training also includes breastfeeding support, so we can address common concerns about breast and nipple care. We’ll also assist with making sure you have access to nutritious food, whether that means answering questions, providing recipes, grocery shopping, or preparing meals.

A postpartum doula will also care for her client emotionally. We are trained in signs and symptoms of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders, and we work hard to make sure our clients are aware of them as well. We’re always there to provide a listening ear for whatever is on your mind. Postpartum can be an intense time, and a friendly listener never hurts.

Baby Care

Postpartum doulas love babies; it’s our job, and for many of us, it’s our passion as well. We are delighted to hold your baby so you can shower, sleep, or take a walk in peace.

We can also answer questions about the maze of baby options: Which baby carrier should I choose? How does this Moby wrap work? How do I give my tiny baby a bath? How do I file her nails? Is my mother in law right when she says I’m nursing my baby too much? Etc.! Your doula should be able to present you with the whole spectrum of options so you can choose what’s right for your family.

We’re also a resource for feeding support. We can address common breastfeeding concerns, and formula feeding concerns. We’ll provide referrals to specialists if needed – we have a network of wonderful birth professionals in our community so we know who will take good care of you!

Household Management

Your postpartum doula can handle the household tasks that you would normally handle. But when you have a new baby, that’s your full-time job. It’s amazing how one tiny baby (let alone two babies!) can take up 24 hours a day with her constant needs. Your doula will help you with: meal preparation, laundry, light tidying and organizing, emptying the dishwasher, running errands, and more. That way you can rest and snuggle your baby.

Non-Judgmental Support

I think this is the most unique aspect of the postpartum doula’s role. No one else in your postpartum life supports you in this way. Your doula has a deep knowledge base about all things postpartum, but she’s not emotionally involved in your life. She won’t give you her opinions or judge the choices you make. She’ll listen to you as much as you need, and share options and resources when appropriate. For many new parents, this is a huge relief! Especially if it’s your first time, it helps so much to hear, “You’re doing just fine.”

I hope this was a helpful overview of postpartum doula care. For more info, check out my website or email me with questions.

 Orr

Kathryn Orr, CD(DONA), LCCE
MotherBaby Doula Services
kathryn@motherbabydoulaservices.com
www.motherbabydoulaservices.com
www.facebook.com/motherbabydoulaservices

Veronica Jacobsen, BA, CD(DONA), CLC, CPST, LCCE, FACCE

DONA-Certified Birth Doula, Certified Lactation Counselor, Child Passenger Safety Technician, Lamaze Certified Childbirth Educator, Fellow of the Academy of Certified Childbirth Educators

Opening BabyLove in September of 2011 has allowed me to build a space where all families can come to get good information in a caring, welcoming environment. I have found that not only do I love teaching more than ever, but I also really love running a business. Hopefully my passion for every aspect of BabyLove shines through.
I live in Richfield with my husband, and I am a mother of a two great children. When I can steal a few free moments, I love to go on adventures with my family, cook, garden, thrift, can, and craft.